Allergen

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Related to Contact allergen: contact dermatitis, Allergic contact dermatitis

allergen

 [al´er-jen]
1. a substance, protein or nonprotein, capable of inducing allergy or specific hypersensitivity.
2. a purified protein of a food (such as milk, eggs, or wheat), bacterium, or pollen. adj., adj allergen´ic. Allergens are used to test a patient for hypersensitivity to specific substances (see skin test). They are also used to desensitize or hyposensitize allergic individuals (see immunotherapy).

Almost any substance in the environment can be an allergen. The list of known allergens includes plant pollens, spores of mold, animal dander, house dust, foods, feathers, dyes, soaps, detergents, cosmetics, plastics, and drugs. Allergens can enter the body by being inhaled, swallowed, touched, or injected. Once the allergen comes in contact with body cells it sets off a series of immune responses that can range from localized inflammation to a fatal systemic anaphylaxis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·ler·gen

(al'er-jen),
An antigen that induces an allergic or hypersensitive response.
[allergy + G. -gen, producing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

allergen

(ăl′ər-jən)
n.
A substance, such as pollen, that causes an allergy.

al′ler·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

allergen

Any biomolecular substance (antigen) capable of evoking an allergic reaction, specifically a type-1 hypersensitivity reaction through immunoglobulin E-mediated reaction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

allergen

Immunology A substance–eg, pollen, dander, mold, which can evoke an immediate-type hypersensitivity–allergic reaction, triggering a release of histamine. See Airborne allergen, Cockroach allergen, Feline allergen, Immunogenic allergen.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

al·ler·gen

(al'ĕr-jĕn)
An incitant of altered reactivity (allergy), an antigenic substance.
[allergy + G. -gen, producing]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

allergen

Any ANTIGEN causing ALLERGY or causing an allergic reaction in a sensitive person.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

allergen

an antigen that produces an allergic response.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Allergen

A foreign substance, such as mites in house dust or animal dander which, when inhaled, causes the airways to narrow and produces symptoms of asthma.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·ler·gen

(al'ĕr-jĕn)
Antigen that induces an allergic or hypersensitive response.
[allergy + G. -gen, producing]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about Allergen

Q. How do I diagnose an allergy? I think I’m allergic to something. I’ve been having running nose, sneezing, and even problems breathing every once in a while. How can I find the cause?

A. There can be thousands of materials that you are allergic to. But usually people are allergic to the same things (cats, pets in general, type of foods and so forth..). what you can do is an allergy test- It’ll cover most of the usual things. Here is a video that explains it:
http://www.5min.com/Video/Allergy-Testing-9036

Q. Can it be that I stopped being allergic to cats? is it a miracle? I was allergic to cats in my childhood, and yesterday a friend cat jumped on me and nothing happened.

A. NO,IF NOTHING HAPPENED

More discussions about Allergen
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the other 2 cases, additional contact allergens included: oxprenolol hydrochloride and epichlorohydrin (a substrate used in the manufacture of medicaments) [3] and hydralazine, bendrofluazide, and several components of the thiuram series [4].
Due to the enormous base of existing contact allergens (over 65.00 U.S.
Upcoming publications, she added, will place MI in the top five most common contact allergens. "MI is in everything, including things you would think would be hypoallergenic," she said.
A comparison of contact allergens among construction and Onon-construction workers attending contact dermatitis clinics in Germany: results of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology from November 1989 to July 1993.
Nickel - The ubiquitous contact allergen. In: Fisher AA, ed.
Nickel remains the most prevalent contact allergen among children.
Members of the American Contact Dermatitis Society can access the Contact Allergen Management Program (CAMP) database to help patients identify allergen-free products based on their patch test results, he said.
LAS VEGAS -- Bacitracin, one of the most commonly used topical antibiotics in the United States, was named "contact allergen of the year" by the American Contact Dermatitis Society, Dr.
Allergic contact dermatitis can present with regional, localized eczematous plaques in areas exposed to contact allergens. Patterns of lesions in areas of contact and worsening with repeat exposures can be clues to this diagnosis.
* Contact allergens. Contact allergens, including plant resins (eg, poison ivy) and metals (eg, nickel) cause local dermatitis through a cell-mediated, delayed hypersensitivity response.
Contact dermatitis (CD) is an inflammatory skin disease caused by chemicals or metal ions that exert irritant (toxic) effects, or by small reactive chemicals (contact allergens) that modify proteins and induce immune responses (predominantly by T-cell response) (1).