heterotroph

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heterotroph

 [het´er-o-trōf″]
a heterotrophic organism.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

het·er·o·troph

(het'ĕr-ō-trof, -trōf),
A microorganism that obtains its carbon, as well as its energy, from organic compounds.
See also: autotroph.
[hetero- + G. trophē, nourishment]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

heterotroph

(hĕt′ər-ə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
n.
An organism that is dependent on complex organic substances for nutrition because it cannot synthesize its own food.

het′er·o·troph′ic adj.
het′er·o·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
het′er·ot′ro·phy (-ə-rŏt′rə-fē) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

het·er·o·troph

(het'ĕr-ō-trōf)
A microorganism that obtains its carbon, as well as its energy, from organic compounds.
See also: autotroph
[hetero- + G. trophē, nourishment]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

heterotroph

an organism dependent on obtaining organic food from the environment because it is unable to synthesize organic material. All animals, fungi, many bacteria, plants without chloroplasts and a few flowering plants (such as insectivorous plants) are heterotrophs, and they obtain almost all their organic material, either directly or indirectly, from the activity of AUTOTROPHS. See HOLOZOIC, SAPROPHYTE, PARASITE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Toxins have evolved as highly effective signal molecules for select consumer species possessing chemoreceptive ability.
Requisite to these progressions are toxin-resistance in source species and at least some consumer species. These necessary steps allow for the introduction and transmission of key molecules among diverse taxa.
The fits yield 3.4, meaning that for every unit of algae consumed by each consumer species, grazers fix 3.4 times more of the algal biomass into consumer biomass than do diggers.
Coexistence has been shown to be possible, theoretically, if the limiting resource fluctuates on an appropriate time scale between states that alternatively favor different consumer species. Such fluctuations could arise from external forces (Levins 1979) or from the activities of the consumers themselves (Koch 1974a, b, Armstrong and McGehee 1980).
Increased productivity in the models with adaptive behavior generally results in a decreased predator vulnerability and decreased exploitation rate on the part of the adapting consumer species. This is the same as is predicted by the two-prey-species models considered here, when they have stable equilibria.
Most consumer species appear to have nonlinear functional responses (Hassell 1978).
Resource productivity - consumer species diversity: simple models of competition in spatially heterogeneous environments.
But such a potential source of random variation in decomposer species richness should not affect the relationship between standing autotrophic biomass and consumer species richness.
Consumers were added as small initial populations (10-25 cells) of each consumer species after algal densities had stabilized ([greater than]14 d).
In the first experiment, we directly manipulated consumer species as an experimental factor.
- To illustrate how invasion resistance changes with time, consider 500 assembly sequences drawn from a species pool with 5 basal and 15 consumer species [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3 OMITTED].