heterotroph

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heterotroph

 [het´er-o-trōf″]
a heterotrophic organism.

het·er·o·troph

(het'ĕr-ō-trof, -trōf),
A microorganism that obtains its carbon, as well as its energy, from organic compounds.
See also: autotroph.
[hetero- + G. trophē, nourishment]

heterotroph

(hĕt′ər-ə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
n.
An organism that is dependent on complex organic substances for nutrition because it cannot synthesize its own food.

het′er·o·troph′ic adj.
het′er·o·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
het′er·ot′ro·phy (-ə-rŏt′rə-fē) n.

het·er·o·troph

(het'ĕr-ō-trōf)
A microorganism that obtains its carbon, as well as its energy, from organic compounds.
See also: autotroph
[hetero- + G. trophē, nourishment]

heterotroph

an organism dependent on obtaining organic food from the environment because it is unable to synthesize organic material. All animals, fungi, many bacteria, plants without chloroplasts and a few flowering plants (such as insectivorous plants) are heterotrophs, and they obtain almost all their organic material, either directly or indirectly, from the activity of AUTOTROPHS. See HOLOZOIC, SAPROPHYTE, PARASITE.

heterotroph

a heterotrophic organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Requisite to these progressions are toxin-resistance in source species and at least some consumer species.
Unlike toxic molecules, barnacle proteins would significantly impact communities without the requisite evolutionary steps of toxin-resistance in source and consumer species.
Coexistence has been shown to be possible, theoretically, if the limiting resource fluctuates on an appropriate time scale between states that alternatively favor different consumer species.
Increased productivity in the models with adaptive behavior generally results in a decreased predator vulnerability and decreased exploitation rate on the part of the adapting consumer species.
Most consumer species appear to have nonlinear functional responses (Hassell 1978).
Resource productivity - consumer species diversity: simple models of competition in spatially heterogeneous environments.
But such a potential source of random variation in decomposer species richness should not affect the relationship between standing autotrophic biomass and consumer species richness.
Consumers were added as small initial populations (10-25 cells) of each consumer species after algal densities had stabilized ([greater than]14 d).
In the first experiment, we directly manipulated consumer species as an experimental factor.
In this experiment, a gradient in consumer species richness was established by choosing species combinations from a range of combinations using eight species of protists.
Direct manipulation of species richness revealed a well-defined decline in autotrophic biomass with respect to increasing consumer species richness [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 7 OMITTED].
Although the univariate tests showed no significant response of species C to any of the four consumer species, Colpoda slightly reduced its mean density, while the other three consumers caused the mean density of this bacterium to increase slightly.