gemination

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gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn),
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn)
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn)
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
sasaanna /ha[??] = ga sas= na/ /sasa-an[??] =na/ old=VC2 old-NEG=VC2 AFF=3M.SBJ 'he is old' 'he is not old' I do not consider consonant length here to be the main cue of negation for several reasons.
A number of minimal pairs indicate that consonant length in this environment is phonemic:
syllable-final [??] madre, Madrid, usted, verdad syllable-initial [d] donde syllable-initial, after <l>, <n> [d] tilde, mundo syllable-initial, intervocalic [??] nada syllable-initial, but phrasally medial [??] los dedos, es duro /p/ /p:/ /s/ /s:/ /b/ /b:/ /[??]/ /t/ /t:/ /m/ /m:/ /d/ /d:/ /n/ /n:/ /k/ /k:/ /[??]/ /g/ /g:/ /r/ /r:/ [f/ /f:/ /l/ /l:/ /v/ /v:/ /[??]/ English and German speakers are not habituated to thinking of consonant length as being phonemic--that is, as triggering changes in meaning--because minimal pairs illustrating this are nonexistent in those languages.
However, unlike in languages such as Italian, the length of the vowel is completely independent of surrounding consonant length in Hungarian.
(11) This consideration is often overlooked, largely because vowel length is not signaled in the orthography, as consonant length usually is.