gemination

(redirected from Consonant gemination)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to Consonant gemination: Geminated pair

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn),
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]

gemination

in dentistry, the "twinning" of a single tooth bud. Geminated teeth usually have a single common root, a common pulp canal, and visible partial cleavage of the enamel crown. The normal quantity of teeth are present in the dental arch. Not to be confused with fusion.

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn)
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn)
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]

gemination (jem´ənā´shən),

n the formation of two teeth from a single tooth germ.

gemination

the abnormal tooth formation as a result of an unsuccessful attempt at forming two separate teeth. There is usually a longitudinal groove.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lexical gemination occurs in nouns intervocalically and word finally as well, but adjectives show consonant gemination only intervocalically.
An alternative explanation is that consonant gemination in Owere requires that only one vowel be elided.
Also, references concern Luick's account of the evolution of the cluster <sc> (179), fates of the velars (180-182), palatalisations (185), critical evaluation of Luick's account of the evolution of the semivowel [j] (189), shift of the yogh to [hi (191), and consonant gemination (203-204).
Consonant gemination is only one form of highlighting a syllable, and stress relocation may be effected by vowel lengthening and/or heightened intonation, with or without gemination of the initial consonant.