consciousness-raising

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consciousness-raising

n.
A process, as by group therapy, of achieving greater awareness of one's needs in order to fulfill one's potential as a person.
References in periodicals archive ?
Not just these two technologies, but also the format of this first consciousness raising meeting--women sitting in a circle on the floor sharing experiences, "as we did then"--became the underlying method of the movement.
Consciousness raising as developed during the Women's Movement in the 1960s and 1970s reflects a tradition of coalition work that has been effaced from or simply ignored by dominant conceptualizations of coalition.
SWICA spokesman Steve Fletcher said, ``This year's MAS carnivals will be a unique combination of collective creativity and consciousness raising.
In this second phase, those invited into private space are not strangers but sisters, and the invitation would be not so much into the bathroom, as into the kitchen, the bedroom, the nursery, the laundry room and onto the consciousness raising sofa, one day even onto the mattress.
With intelligence, pithiness and courage, Doris Anderson took Chatelaine, a typical women's magazine of the 1950s, and turned it into a dynamic instrument of coast-to-coast consciousness raising.
A typesetting error in the table of contents lists seven important radical manifestos and four essays on consciousness raising as method as included in Part One.
Factor X mixes labor organizing with consciousness raising.
Key Words: men's studies courses, pedagogy, consciousness raising, male students
Part 2 ("Feminist Justice and Historical Realism") argues that the practice of feminist consciousness raising in the 1960s and 70s presents a paradigm case of the "Hegelian mediation of the universal" discussed in part 1.
Socialization, recreation, and planned learning experiences are natural allies in consciousness raising.
By defining CR novels as those which "depicted the protagonist's process of consciousness raising" (meaning the process of coming to see the personal as political), "shaped its narrative according to the structure of consciousness raising," or "transact[ed] CR with its readers," she is able to open out her discussion from the most obvious candidates, like Ella Price's Journal and The Women's Room, to include novels that "transact CR" by imagining alternative futures or entire gender systems, like the feminist fantasies of Joanna Russ and Usula LeGuin.
The quick answer: Despite some attitude shifts and consciousness raising, big corporate interests are more entrenched than ever.