connective tissue

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Related to Connective-tissue: Loose connective tissue, connective tissue disorders, Connective tissue disease, Areolar connective tissue

connective tissue

 [kō-nek´tiv]
a fibrous type of body tissue with varied functions; it supports and connects internal organs, forms bones and the walls of blood vessels, attaches muscles to bones, and replaces tissues of other types following injury. Connective tissue consists mainly of long fibers embedded in noncellular matter, the ground substance. The density of these fibers and the presence or absence of certain chemicals make some connective tissues soft and rubbery and others hard and rigid. Compared with most other kinds of tissue, connective tissue has few cells. The fibers contain a protein called collagen. Connective tissue can develop in any part of the body, and the body uses this ability to help repair or replace damaged areas. Scar tissue is the most common form of this substitute. See also collagen diseases.

con·nec·tive tis·sue

the physical or functional supporting tissue of the animal body, a major constituent of which (in addition to various kinds of cells) is an extracellular matrix of ground substance, protein fibers, and structural glycoproteins; it is derived from the mesenchyme, which in turn is derived mainly from mesoderm; the many kinds of connective tissue may be classified according to cell-matrix proportion (loose vs. dense), arrangement of fibers (regular dense vs. irregular dense), fiber type (collagenous, elastic), embedded cell type (adipose, lymphoid, hemopoietic), degree of differentiation (mesenchymal, mucous), location (subcutaneous, periosteal, perichondrial), appearance (areolar, granulation), or nature of matrix (cartilaginous, osseous, or, in the cases of blood and lymph, liquid).

connective tissue

n.
Tissue arising chiefly from the embryonic mesoderm that is characterized by a highly vascular matrix and includes collagenous, elastic, and reticular fibers, adipose tissue, cartilage, and bone. It forms the supporting and connecting structures of the body.

connective tissue

tissue that supports and binds other body tissue and parts. It derives from the mesoderm of the embryo and is dense, containing large numbers of cells and large amounts of intercellular material. The intercellular material is composed of fibers in a matrix or ground substance that may be liquid, gelatinous, or solid, such as in bone and cartilage. Connective tissue fibers may be collagenous or elastic. The matrix or ground material surrounding fibers and cells is a dynamic substance, susceptible to its own special diseases. Kinds of connective tissue are bone tissue, cartilage tissue, dense connective tissue, fibrous tissue, and loose connective tissue.

con·nec·tive tis·sue

(kŏ-nek'tiv tish'ū)
The supporting or framework tissue of the animal body, formed of fibers and ground substance with more or less numerous cells of various kinds. It is derived from the mesenchyme, and this in turn from the mesoderm. The varieties of connective tissue are: areolar or loose; adipose; dense, regular or irregular, white fibrous; elastic; mucous; lymphoid tissue; cartilage; and bone. Blood and lymph may be regarded as connective tissues, the ground substance of which is a liquid.
Synonym(s): interstitial tissue.
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CONNECTIVE TISSUES

connective tissue

Tissue that supports and connects other tissues and parts of the body. Connective tissue has comparatively few cells. Its bulk consists of intercellular substance or matrix, whose nature gives each type of connective tissue its particular properties. The vascular supply varies: cartilage, none; fibrous, poor; adipose, good; and bone, abundant. Connective tissue includes the following types: areolar, adipose, fibrous, elastic, reticular, cartilage, and bone. Blood may also be considered a connective tissue.
illustration
See also: tissue

connective tissue

Loose or dense collections of COLLAGEN fibres and many cells, in a liquid, gelatinous or solid medium. Connective tissue participates in the structure of organs or body tissue or binds them together. It includes cartilage, bone, tooth dentine and lymphoid tissue.

connective tissue

an animal tissue in which the intercellular matrix forms the major part. Such tissues fall into three main groups:
  1. ‘true’ connective tissue (ADIPOSE TISSUE, AREOLAR TISSUE, yellow elastic tissue (LIGAMENTS) and white fibrous tissue (TENDONS);
  2. skeletal tissue: BONE and CARTILAGE;
  3. blood, the last differing from the others in containing no fibres in the matrix (BLOOD PLASMA).

Connective tissue

Tissue that supports and binds other tissue; much of it occurs outside of cells (extra-cellular) and consists of fibrous webs of the polymers, elastin and collagen. Cutis laxa is associated with defects in these fibers.

connective tissue

; interstitial tissue tissue, of mesodermal origin, forming structural supporting frameworks, and made up of fibrous material in a liquid, semisolid or solid ground substance, e.g. musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, blood, areolar, adipose, fibrous, elastic, mucous, lymphatic and dermal tissues

connective tissue,

n structural tissue composed of fibrous materials and a substrate that contains a variety of cells. Bone, cartilage, hair, nails, and fibrous tissue between cells and around muscles are all considered types of connective tissue.
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Connective tissue.

con·nec·tive tis·sue

(kŏ-nek'tiv tish'ū)
Physical or functional supporting tissue of the animal body, a major constituent of which (in addition to various kinds of cells) is an extracellular matrix of ground substance, protein fibers, and structural glycoproteins; derived from the mesenchyme, which in turn is derived mainly from mesoderm.

connective tissue

a fibrous type of body tissue with varied functions. The connective tissue system supports and connects internal organs, forms bones and the walls of blood vessels, attaches muscles to bones, and replaces tissues of other types following injury.
Connective tissue consists mainly of long fibers embedded in noncellular matter, the ground substance. The density of these fibers and the presence or absence of certain chemicals make some connective tissues soft and rubbery and others hard and rigid. Compared with most other kinds of tissue, connective tissue has few cells. The fibers contain a protein called collagen.
Connective tissue can develop in any part of the body, and the body uses this ability to help repair or replace damaged areas. Scar tissue is the most common form of this substitute. See also collagen diseases.

elastic connective tissue
found especially in supportive tissues, e.g. some ligaments, and tendons, e.g. nuchal ligament or tunica flava.
reticular connective tissue
a type of connective tissue found principally in myeloid and lymphatic organs; they account for reticular meshwork.

Patient discussion about connective tissue

Q. My neighbor's kid had a lens dislocation due to Marfan's disease. Is this a contagious thing? My neighbor's have a sweet 8 year old boy. he had a lens dislocation due to a connective tissue disease named Marfan (I think that the name). It sounds like a very serious condition. My boy is playing with this kid several hour a week. should I take him to the GP to see that his is not infected with this marfan thing?

A. As in love and war so is in medicine the is no always nor never. It is probably the marfan that caused your neighbor kid the lens dislocation but you can never know for sure.
If you want there is nothing wrong in taking your boy for an annual check of an ophthalmologist.

More discussions about connective tissue
References in periodicals archive ?
Plaintiffs with connective-tissue injuries, which don't show up on X-rays, have a tough time convincing these jurors that their injuries are real and deserve compensation.
The report went even further, however: "None of these studies demonstrated that the coexistence of connective-tissue disease with silicone breast implants is any more prevalent than would be expected by chance.
Since silicone gel from implants is most commonly accused of causing autoimmune disease, or connective-tissue disease, it isn't surprising that a large number of studies on both animals and humans have looked for a link between silicone exposure and autoimmune/connective-tissue disease.
She alleged aches, pains, and fatigue caused by her implants without citing any illness more specific than autoimmune disease, a catchall phrase for a variety of connective-tissue diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, lupus, Sjogren's Syndrome, fibromyalgia, and Raynaud's Disease.
And even if the risk is real, the authors calculate that it would mean only one extra case of connective-tissue disease, like arthritis or lupus, a year for every 3,000 women with implants.
he or she has treated patients suffering connective-tissue injuries.
End the cross-examination by pointing out that the witness has admitted that people do suffer connective-tissue injuries and that they are painful and debilitating.
Kessler's comments came only weeks after the publication of a major study showing no clear link between silicone gel implants and connective-tissue diseases.
Breast implant manufacturers and some doctors claim the study should end the debate over whether implants cause connective-tissue illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and scleroderma.
Researchers discovered that only 3 of the 516 women who had been diagnosed as having connective-tissue diseases also had breast implants.
Researchers also looked at connective-tissue disease laboratory tests to see if there were significant differences in the two groups of women and found none.
Responding to reports of cases of connective-tissue disease and autoimmune disorders after breast augmentation, the Food and Drug Administration called for a moratorium on their use in January 1992.

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