inguinal falx

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Related to Conjoint tendon: deep inguinal ring, lacunar ligament

inguinal falx

[TA]
common tendon of insertion of the transversus and internal oblique muscles into the crest and tubercle of the pubis and iliopectineal line; it is frequently largely muscular rather than aponeurotic and may be poorly developed; forms posterior wall of medial inguinal canal.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·gui·nal falx

(ing'gwi-năl fawlks) [TA]
Common tendon of insertion of the transversus and internal oblique muscles into the crest and tubercle of the pubis and iliopectineal line; it is frequently largely muscular rather than aponeurotic and may be poorly developed; forms posterior wall of medial inguinal canal.
Synonym(s): falx inguinalis [TA] , Henle ligament.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
He received an MRI that night which revealed a tear in the left rectus abdominis, rectus sheath and a portion of the conjoint tendon. The team physician recommended surgery based on the MRI findings.
Physical examination revealed sharp local pain on palpation over the left medial inguinal ligament, pubic symphysis, conjoint tendon and rectus abdominis insertion.
Diagnostic ultrasound imaging revealed a left rectus abdominis tear at the insertion on the pubic tubercle and a tear of a portion of the left conjoint tendon. The tear measured 12.6mm x 4.4mm.
This case describes the non-surgical management of ID due to a rectus abdominis and conjoint tendon tear.
(2) It includes any combination of injuries to the posterior inguinal wall, conjoint tendon, inguinal ligament, rectus abdominis, hip adductors, external oblique musculature, etc.
With a power saw, osteotomy of the corcoid process is done proximal to attachment of conjoint tendon of coracobrachalis and short head of biceps (around 1.5 cm proximal to the tip of the coracoid).
In modified Boytchevs procedure, the rerouted conjoint tendon which is passed deep to the subscapularis and reattached at its original anatomical location, acts as a dynamic brace over antero inferior aspect of the shoulder joint.
Furthermore, the piriformis and conjoint tendons, which are the external rotators of the hip, are ruptured or damaged in about 70% of patients, "and you can't repair them.