conium

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Related to Conium maculatum: Cicuta maculata

co·ni·um

(kō-nē'ŭm),
The dried unripe fruit of Conium maculatum (family Umbelliferae), also known as spotted cowbane or spotted parsley; it has been used as a sedative, antispasmodic, and anodyne.
Synonym(s): hemlock
[L. fr. G. kōneion, hemlock]
References in periodicals archive ?
Conium maculatum (poison hemlock) belongs to the Apiaceae (formerly
Gardner, "Ingestion of poison hemlock (Conium maculatum)," Western Journal of Medicine, vol.
Para el caso de la presencia de polen de Reseda media la relacion es directa en las mieles de Rhamnus frangula (al igual que Conium maculatum, graminea silvestre, Pinus pinaster, Salix triandra y Viola arvensis-t.).
Reviewing several dilutions, he balanced on 1M Conium maculatum from Hahnemann Laboratories Inc.
(105) Using various methods he was able to identify the vegetable matter in the stomach contents as consisting of Conium maculatum (L).
This study was prompted by initial field investigations related to the presence of Conium maculatum (hereafter, Conium) in Cook County.
(20), in a prescription pharmacy and consisted of Phytolacca decandra CH 12, Lachesis CH 12, Belladona CH 12, Phosphorus CH 30, Bryonia dioica CH 12, Conium maculatum CH 12, Apis mellifica CH 30, Mercurius solubilis CH 12, and Pyrogenium CH 6.
There have also been fatalities among children who use hollow hemlock stems (Conium maculatum) as blowpipes.
To confirm the effectiveness of homoeopathic medicines for prostate cancer, the researchers in this trial assessed the effects of Sabal serrulata, Conium maculatum and Thuja occidentalis against PC-3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer cell cultures and against the growth of prostate tumors in mice.
(94.) See Thomas Laarson, Some History and Effects of Conium Maculatum L (Uppsala Univ.
Lawton (publications manager, Missouri Botanical Garden) introduces plants, that if combined in a bouquet, would send decidedly mixed messages; sweet cicely and parsley have pleasant connotations, while Conium maculatum is the poison hemlock that killed Socrates.