concentrated animal feeding operations

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concentrated animal feeding operations

, confined animal feeding operations,

CAFO

Industrial-scale livestock production in which a large number of chickens, cows, pigs, or other animals are confined in a local area for food production. CAFOs produce a variety of by-products that may impact environmental health, including large quantities of manure and associated gases, which affect air, soil, and water quality. They provide potential breeding grounds for diseases that may spread from animals to humans. Antibiotics used in these operations have been linked to the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.
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[section][section] 122.23(b)(2), 122.27(b) (2011) (providing examples how the EPA has interpreted point source as applied to confined animal feeding operations and silvicultural activities).
at 743 (citing Confined Animal Feeding Operations, 41 Fed.
Those who manage these so-called confined animal feeding operations are appropriately called "operators." The operators do not have freedom of choice in their management practices, which is why contracts have been criticized as unjust and why the U.S.
In April 2008, the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) published a comprehensive report on confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) titled CAFOs Uncovered: The Untold Costs of Confined Animal Feeding Operations.
The Confined Animal Feeding Operations Act, passed by the 1989 Oregon Legislature, is keeping the pressure on farmers.
A number of excellent studies have examined the drift of bioaerosols from confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) into the surrounding rural agricultural communities.
These products have a variety of applications and are used to manage flows from sub-surface agricultural drainage systems, wetlands, surface ditches, farm ponds, retention and detention structures, confined animal feeding operations and aquaculture to name a few.
Confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) house large numbers of animals, flush animal wastes into open-air waste pits, and apply partially decomposed wastes to land, releasing pollutants into soil, air, and water (National Research Council 2003).
This fact, together with the barbaric, inhumane treatment of these sentient beings, will always make me wonder why confined animal feeding operations even exist.
Thousands of confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been constructed in eastern North Carolina.
Confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are becoming a horrifically polluting hallmark of competitive agriculture.
In February 2000, Kentucky adopted emergency regulations to address the potential pollution problems of large-scale confined animal feeding operations in the state.