cone

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Related to Cone Shell: Stone fish, Blue ringed octopus

cone

 [kōn]
1. a solid figure or body having a circular base and tapering to a point.
2. one of the conelike structures which, with the rods, form the light-sensitive elements of the retina; the cones make possible the perception of color. See also eye and vision. Called also retinal cone.
3. in radiology, a conical or open-ended cylindrical structure formerly used as an aid in centering the radiation beam and as a guide to source-to-film distance. Cones were commonly attached to the x-ray tube prior to the use of the collimator.
4. in root canal therapy, a solid substance with a tapered form, usually made of gutta-percha or silver, fashioned to conform to the shape of a root canal.
ether cone a cone-shaped device used over the face in administration of ether for anesthesia.
gutta-percha cone in root canal therapy, a plastic radiopaque cone made from gutta-percha and other ingredients, available in standard sizes according to the dimensions of root canal reamers and files; used to fill and seal the canal along with sealer cements. Called also gutta-percha point.
cone of light the triangular reflection of light seen on the tympanic membrane.
pressure cone the area of compression exerted by a mass in the brain, as in transtentorial herniation.
retinal cone cone (def. 2).
silver cone silver point.

cone

(kōn),
1. A surface joining a circle to a point above the plane containing the circle.
2. The photosensitive, outward-directed, conic process of a cone cell essential for sharp vision and color vision; cones are the only photoreceptors in the fovea centralis and become interspersed with increasing numbers of rods toward the periphery of the retina. Synonym(s): cone cell of retina
3. Metallic cylinder or truncated cone, either circular or square in cross-section, used to confine a beam of x-rays.
Synonym(s): conus (1)
[G. kōnos, cone]

cone

(kōn)
n.
Physiology One of the photoreceptors in the retina of the eye that is responsible for daylight and color vision. These photoreceptors are most densely concentrated in the fovea centralis, creating the area of greatest visual acuity. Also called cone cell.

cone

Gynecology Cone biopsy, see there Neurophysiology
1. A color receptor cell in the retina of the eye.
2. Growth cone, see there Urogynecology See Vaginal cone.

cone

(kōn)
1. A surface joining a circle to a point above the plane containing the circle.
2. The photosensitive, outward-directed, conical process of a cone cell essential for sharp vision and color vision; cones are the only photoreceptor in the fovea centralis and become interspersed with increasing numbers of rods toward the periphery of the retina.
3. Metallic cylinder or truncated cone, either circular or square in cross-section, used to confine a beam of x-rays.
Synonym(s): conus (1) .
[G. kōnos, cone]

cone

  1. (in plants) a reproductive structure in the form of a conical mass of scale-like sporophylls surrounding a central axis, found particularly in GYMNOSPERMS but also in other plant groups, e.g. horsetails (Equisetales).
  2. (in animals) a light-sensitive structure in the vertebrate eye. See CONE CELL.

cone

(kōn)
1. A surface joining a circle to a point above the plane containing the circle.
2. Metallic cylinder or truncated cone used to confine a beam of x-rays.
[G. kōnos, cone]
References in periodicals archive ?
Basic Red 46 dye molecules on the cone shell surface.
Basic Red 46 biosorption by the pine cone shell was found to be 3.2686 kJ [mol.sup.-1] as shown in Table 5.
Basic Red 46 by the cone shell was calculated as -6.6536 kJ [mol.sup.-1].
The logistic model was used to define the biosorption kinetics of dye onto the cone shell and this model presented the best fit to the experimental results with the most suitable statistical outcomes as displayed in Table 6.
Hereby, the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-limiting step for the dye biosorption by the cone shell and also the other mechanism(s) may control the rate of biosorption or all of which may be operating simultaneously.
Basic Red 46 by the pine cone shell was found to be 0.0977 (Table 7).
Just before dawn he found two cone shells he couldn't identify, three inches long and audacious, attempting to devour a damselfish they had paralyzed.
But first, you will find one of these cone shells for my daughter, and you will sting her with it.
He made them pots of chai, tried politely to explain that he had no cone shells, that they would be seriously injured or killed, if they were bitten.
"Before I left the States I did some reading," he said, "about cone shells." It was dawn.
He began to search for cone shells. He waded, turned in a circle, became quickly disoriented.