sauce béarnaise syndrome

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sauce béarnaise syndrome

An acquired and permanent conditioned response (e.g., severe nausea) which develops shortly after exposure to a particular stimulus (e.g., béarnaise sauce), as well as other tastes and odours.

First decribed by Martin Seligman 1972, after experiencing nausea following ingestion of béarnaise sauce, it was later developed by John Garcia as a rat model for conditioned taste aversion, using an array of noxious stimuli. Of the stimuli, only tastes and odours evoked the conditioned response, leading him to conclude that it was an evolutionary adaptation to avoid spoilt or poisonous food, which Garcia termed the preparedness hypothesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Latent inhibition in conditioned taste aversion: The roles of stimulus frequency and duration and the amount of fluid ingested during pre-exposure.
Effect of previous locoweed (Astragalus and Oxytropis species) intoxication on conditioned taste aversions in horses and sheep.
Formation of a context-running association in running-based conditioned taste aversion in rats [in Japanese].
Conditioned taste aversions induced by phencyclidine and other antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate.
One-trial conditioned taste aversion in Lymnaea: good and poor performers in long-term memory acquisition.
Conditioned taste aversion induced by self-administered drugs: Paradox revisited.
In the clinic, data similarly demonstrate that immune system parameters can be conditioned to the environment in which chemotherapy is administered and immuno-suppression supports conditioned taste aversion (Bovbjerg et al., 1990; Fredrikson et al, 1993).
He refers to the behavior as conditioned taste aversion, but many animal investigators call it simply the Garcia effect.
Spontaneous recovery after extinction of a conditioned taste aversion. Animal Learning and Behavior, 24, 341-348.
Bourne, Calton, Gustayson, and Schachtman (1992) and Revusky and Reilly (1989), using inescapable swim as a source of stress, examined the effects of this stressor on conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in rats.
Particularly, Rosas and Bouton (1997) found ABA renewal with a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) procedure, whereas Rosas, Garcia-Gutierrez and Callejas-Aguilera (2007) reported AAB and ABA renewal.