consciousness

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Related to Conciousness: consciousness, levels of consciousness

consciousness

 [kon´shus-nes]
1. the state of being conscious; fully alert, aware, oriented, and responsive to the environment.
2. subjective awareness of the aspects of cognitive processing and the content of the mind.
3. the current totality of experience of which an individual or group is aware at any time.
4. in psychoanalysis, the conscious.
5. in Newman's conceptual model, health as expanding consciousness, the informational capacity of the human system, or its capacity for interacting with the environment; consciousness is considered to be coextensive with the universe, residing in all matter.
clouding of consciousness see clouding of consciousness.
levels of consciousness
1. an early freudian concept referring to the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious.
2. the somewhat loosely defined states of awareness of and response to stimuli, generally considered an integral component of the assessment of an individual's neurologic status. Levels of consciousness range from full consciousness (behavioral wakefulness, orientation as to time, place, and person, and a capacity to respond appropriately to stimuli) to deep coma (complete absence of response).

Consciousness depends upon close interaction between the intact cerebral hemispheres and the central gray matter of the upper brainstem. Although the hemispheres contribute most of the specific components of consciousness (memory, intellect, and learned responses to stimuli), there must be arousal or activation of the cerebral cells before they can function. For this reason, it is suggested that a detailed description of the patient's response to specific auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli will be more meaningful to those concerned with neurologic assessment than would the use of such terms as alert, drowsy, stuporous, semiconscious, or other equally subjective labels. Standardized systems, such as the glasgow coma scale, aid in objective and less ambiguous evaluation of levels of consciousness.

Examples of the kinds of stimuli that may be used to determine a patient's responsiveness as a measure of consciousness include calling him by name, producing a sharp noise, giving simple commands, gentle shaking, pinching the biceps, and application of a blood pressure cuff. Responses to stimuli should be reported in specific terms relative to how the patient responded, whether the response was appropriate, and what occurred immediately after the response.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·scious·ness

(con'shŭs-nes),
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

consciousness

(kŏn′shəs-nĭs)
n.
1. The state or condition of being conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the conscious.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

consciousness

Full awareness of self and of one's environment. The conviction that it is possible to explain the sources of consciousness has spawned a small library of books purporting to do so.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
State of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
I have struggled, to the limit of my abilities, to talk about Shakespeare and not about myself, but I am certain that the plays have flooded my conciousness, and that the plays read me better than I read them" (xix-xx).
But what is worth noting as the economy continues towobble are the businesses and organizations that are succeeding, and not with a win-at-all costs approach butwith ethical principles and community conciousness intact, whether by seeing opportunity where others seeonly obstacles or simply by refusing to let obstacles derail their vision.
Finally, Okubo describes a Japanese intervention program being used for patients who have prolonged disturbances of conciousness.
A XI CANA CODEX OF CHANGING CONCIOUSNESS: WRITINGS, 2000-2010.
"Levels of conciousness and self-awareness: A comparison and integration of various views." Retrieved 2 September 2010, from http://www.societyofrobots.com/ robottheory/self-awareness_review.pdf
The patient was immediately started on an esmolol drip and required intubation due to the development of a decreased level of conciousness and decorticate posturing.
In search of an emotional system in the brain: Leaping form fear to emotion and conciousness. In: Gazzaniga MS (ed).
Block, N., 1995, "On a Confusion about a Function of Conciousness", Behavioral and Brain Sciences, vol.
"I belong to Iskon, the international society for Krishna conciousness. But, people ask me about my faith.