paradigm

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paradigm

 [par´ah-dīm]
a shared understanding among scientists or scholars working in a discipline regarding the important problems, structures, values, and assumptions determining that discipline.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

paradigm

An example, hypothesis, model, or pattern; a widely accepted explanation for a group of biomedical or other phenomena that become accepted as data accumulate to corroborate aspects of the paradigm's explanation or theory, as occurred in the 'central dogma' of molecular biology. See Central dogma, Paradigm shift.

PARADIGM

Endocrinology A clinical trial–Pramlintide for Amylin Replacement Adjunct for Diabetes in Glycemic Management
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

paradigm

1. A human being's mental model of the world, which may or may not conform to that of others but is often stereotypical.
2. In the philosophy of science, a general conception of the nature of scientific operation within which a particular scientific activity is undertaken. Paradigms are, of their nature, persistent and hard to change. Major advances in science-such, for instance, as the realization of the concept of the quantum or the significance of evolution in medicine-involve painful paradigmic shifts which some people, notably the older scientists, find hard to make.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Now Davidson's concern here is to reject conceptual relativism: the idea that we can make sense of there being a conceptual scheme that is not our own, to which truth would be relativised.
He agrees that we should give up the idea of experience as something extra-conceptual, but this does not mean that we have to give up sensibility as a faculty of mind that makes our conceptual scheme answerable to the world.
However, the poetic representation of the feminine and of its bodily functions as the traditionally repudiated and excluded constitutes, as Butler suggests (1990: 27), the possibility of a critique and disruption of the male hegemonic conceptual scheme.
They form the language or conceptual scheme in which the empirical investigation is carried out.
He denies the radical incommensurability among conceptual schemes (and may even be plausibly conceived as denying the very idea of a conceptual scheme).
In the essay "On the Very Idea of a Conceptual Scheme" (1974), Davidson notes that the idea of "conceptual schemes" that structure our experience is widespread in philosophy, and that languages have become the leading candidates for such schemes.
For Lynch's view of language according to which different conceptual schemes will recognize different ontologies, is a component of a Wittgensteinian view according to which a conceptual scheme is itself embedded in a "form of life." Surely Lynch could argue, against Blackburn, that because the contending concepts arise within different "forms of life," concatenation would be impossible; for people can participate in, or subscribe to, just the one form of life at a time.
One could regard the overall conceptual scheme as "constitutive", because it contrasts with, say, a biological taxonomy that has to be squared with "objective" reality.
This conceptual scheme yields an elegant two-by-three matrix for ordering the data.
Existing 'languages of morality,' in his view, were merely fragments of a conceptual scheme which was no longer present in its entirety."
It was both the strength and the weakness of Frye's version of intertextuality that his startling analogies and cross-references formed part of a conceptual scheme. The literary universe might have an infinitely expanding horizon but it had a centre and hence a discernible structure.

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