fertilization age

(redirected from Conceptual age)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Conceptual age: Conceptional age

fertilization age

(fĕr-til-i-zā'shŭn āj), [TE]
age of embryo or fetus defined by the time elapsed since fertilization of the oocyte.
Synonym(s): conceptual age

fertilization age

See fetal age.

fer·til·i·za·tion age

(fĕr'til-ī-zā'shŭn āj)
This age begins at the time of fertilization with the sperm entering the oocyte and forming the zygote; it is the true age of the embryo and the preferred determination of age.
Synonym(s): conceptual age.
References in periodicals archive ?
16) Through these problem-solving projects, students have attempted to incorporate Pink's thinking as it relates to lawyering in this new, Conceptual Age, with some degree of success.
PINK'S "WHOLE NEW MIND" AND THE LEGAL PROFESSION IN THE CONCEPTUAL AGE
Conceptual Age software will focus on novelty and nuance to remain competitive and appealing.
Conventional wisdom regarding innovation and the management of it is becoming obsolete as we enter the Conceptual Age.
The purpose of this qualitative study was to extract from purposively selected literature the essential factors and elements that will influence career counselor behavior in the conceptual age.
The Conceptual Age solicits the powers of the right hemisphere, aptitudes of imagination, invention, and empathy.
The conceptual age is characterised by people engaged in and making their living from many forms of creativity, cultural pursuits and the caring professions, all of which emphasise the right brain and depend on empathy to sense and make connections: social and ecological, intellectual and emotional.
Author and speaker Dan Pink (Free Agent Nation) had the brush with him and used it to make a point during his general session presentation, which he based on his new book, A Whole New Mind: Moving From the Information Age to the Conceptual Age.
Pink, a frequent contributor to Wired Magazine, identifies the conceptual age as the next great opportunity for business leaders to differentiate themselves and their organizations.
Daniel Pink's book A Whole New Mind: Moving From the Information Age to the Conceptual Age (2005) acknowledges Asia (the outsourcing trend described by Friedman) as well as two trends that affect an individual's value in the labor market: abundance (rising affluence, which leads to markets of not just functional but pleasing goods and services) and automation (improvements in mechanized and artificial intelligence labor).

Full browser ?