interface

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interface

 [in´ter-fās″]
1. in chemistry, the boundary between two systems or phases.
2. a connection between two computer subsystems, or the hardware required to exchange data through such a connection, or an area of computer storage that can be accessed by more than one system.

in·ter·face

(in'tĕr-fās),
1. A surface that forms a common boundary of two bodies.
2. The boundary between regions of different radiopacity, acoustic, or magnetic resonance properties; the projection of the interface between tissues of different such properties on an image.

interface

/in·ter·face/ (in´ter-fās) the boundary between two systems or phases.interfa´cial

interface

[in′tərfās]
Etymology: L, inter + facies, face
1 the connection between different elements of a computer system or between different computers.
2 the method by which a computer user interacts with a computer system as displayed on a monitor screen, such as a graphical user interface.

interface

Informatics
1. The electronic connection where 2 parts of a system are joined–eg, software program meets a hardware component, or where hardware meets an input device.
2. Software that joins 2 different information systems. See Application program interface, Bidirectional interface, Command line interface, Fiber distributed data interface, GUI interface, Haptic interface, Messaging API interface, Parallel interface, Serial interface.

in·ter·face

(in'tĕr-fās)
1. A surface that forms a common boundary of two bodies.
2. The boundary between regions of different radiopacity, acoustic, or magnetic resonance properties; the projection of the interface between tissues of different such properties on an image.
3. The connection between discrete parts of a computer system.

interface

A surface forming a common barrier or boundary between two objects.

in·ter·face

(in'tĕr-fās)
1. Surface that forms a common boundary of two bodies.
2. Boundary between regions of different radiopacity, acoustic, or magnetic resonance properties.

interface (in´turfās),

n the surface, such as a plane surface, formed between the walls of a prepared cavity or extracoronal preparation and a restoration. It forms a common boundary between the tooth structure and the restorative material.
interface, computer,
n a common boundary (connection) between automatic data processing systems or parts of a system.

interface

the point where two systems or structures meet.

chemical interface
the boundary between two chemical systems or phases.
interface dermatitis
skin disease with histopathological changes, either hydropic degeneration or lichenoid cellular infiltrate or both, involving dermoepidermal junction.
ecological interface
the boundary between ecosystems.
hydropic interface
a type of interface dermatitis in which the main lesion at the dermoepidermal junction is hydropic degeneration.
lichenoid interface
a type of interface dermatitis in which the main lesion at the dermoepidermal junction is like lichen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brain computer interfaces dramatically change the way players interact with a game and, as such, have a profound effect on the gaming experience.
Their presentations included new data from the surgical, neurological and scientific efforts that have led to the use of the BrainGate System by those with quadriplegia to control computer interfaces using thought.
Oxford Semiconductor also has a strong reputation in high speed serial communication chips, and offers complete solutions for bridging between a wide-range of standard computer interfaces.
18 /PRNewswire/ -- Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) today announced the introduction of two computer interfaces that enable its new 1570 and 1575 digital copiers and its ColorEdge 1525 and 1550 copiers to function as high speed printers.
The newsletter covers the ongoing technology transfer from medical devices to commercial products in emerging markets like computer interfaces and training/simulation, as well as technologies including neural prostheses, neural sensing and stimulation and brain-computer interfaces.
Oxford Semiconductor also has a strong reputation in high-speed serial communication chips, and offers complete solutions for bridging between a wide range of standard computer interfaces.

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