animation

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animation

 [an″ĭ-ma´shun]
the quality of being full of life.
suspended animation temporary suspension or cessation of the vital functions, with loss of consciousness.

an·i·ma·tion

(an'i-mā'shŭn),
1. The state of being alive.
2. Liveliness; high spirits.
[L. animo, pp. -atus, to make alive; anima, breath, soul]

an·i·ma·tion

(an'i-mā'shŭn)
1. The state of being alive.
2. Liveliness; high spirits.
[L. animo, pp. -atus, to make alive; anima, breath, soul]
References in periodicals archive ?
This study has shown that the use of computer animations assists students to better understand complex and difficult concepts in various computer courses.
A little over 36 percent of those are used daily in the production of commercial computer animation and visual effects.
Another advantage: The CD holds considerably more information than the hard copy, including three-dimensional computer animation, video clips and great color pictures.
This video is a good companion to Crystal Production's video, Computer Animation, which features a demonstration of basic computer animation by Don Wass.--B.H.
Many of the original team are involved in the remakes, which will use computer animation to illustrate Ivor's adventures for the very first time.
Kerlow - the Director of Digital Production at The Walt Disney Company - has produced the third edition of 'The Art of 3D Computer Animation and Effects'.
Multimedia presentations are increasingly popular, and many attorneys are considering using forensic computer animation for the first time.
The Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design (ACCAD) at The Ohio State University is an international leader in sophisticated computing and visualization technology, including groundbreaking computer animation and graphics.
They played with visual and rhythmic perception, and with Autour de la perception (1968), he began experimenting with computer animation, again emphasizing non-representational, cyclically repeating images.
Wass begins by making a plea for adding computer animation to the curriculum.
Computer animation technology has developed substantially in the past few years allowing lawyers to incorporate cinematic special effects into their courtroom presentation.(1) The problem is that these special effects have no probative value, result in a "slickly" produced animation that leads the jury to accept the testimony presented in the animation and, consequently, discount the probative value of the testimony presented by other witnesses.
A movie made without computer animation is rare enough in this digital crazed time.

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