involuntary sterilization

(redirected from Compulsory sterilization)
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involuntary sterilization

Any procedure that renders a legally incompetent person permanently infertile. It is performed only under court order, and only when other less drastic means of preventing unwanted procreation have failed.
See also: sterilization
References in periodicals archive ?
One got to see its bizarre manifestation when Sadhvi Deva Thakur recently sought compulsory sterilization of Muslims and Christians in the country to bring down their population.
States of eugenics: Institutions and practices of compulsory sterilization in California.
No goose-stepping, brown-shirted thugs here, just ordinary folk inspired by Progressive propaganda to enact laws that would improve mankind by adjusting the contents of its gene pool through compulsory sterilization. To paraphrase a commercial jingle once deployed by a leading American chemical company, "Better things for better living through surgery," and never mind whether the patient consented or not.
Compulsory sterilization laws, which were passed in 32 states from 1907 to 1937, and resulted in more than 60,000 reproductive surgeries, overwhelmingly performed on poor, undereducated, and minority women and men, epitomize this egregious facet of eugenics.
In 1922, Laughlin published Eugenical Sterilization in the United States to help states pass constitutional compulsory sterilization laws.
When the Nazis established their compulsory sterilization program in 1933, they said they were following "the American pathfinders Madison Grant" and a Grant disciple, Lothrop Stoddard.
Compulsory sterilization was practiced in 30 states, starting with Indiana in 1907.
It was an interesting choice of words, because Sanger, who also published much about abortion and birth control, was also an advocate for the compulsory sterilization of ignorant people.
(14) By the 1920s, 33 states had compulsory sterilization laws.
America, to its great shame, was in many ways the vanguard of the movement: 31 states passed compulsory sterilization laws in the early 1900s; over 62,000 individuals were sterilized before these practices ended in the 1970s.
In the 1920s Margaret Sanger in New York, who founded Planned Parenthood, said, "The least fit to carry on the race are increasing it most rapidly." In the United Kingdom, Marie Stopes said that she would "legislate compulsory sterilization of the insane, feeble-minded, revolutionary, and half castes." In the 1950s, a movement known as 'Trans-humanism' supported the use of science and technology to improve mental and physical capacities.