brain herniation

(redirected from Compression of brain)

brain herniation

Pressure-induced prolapse of part of the brain into adjacent spaces, which occurs when the brain is under high pressure.
 
Clinical findings
Coma, paralysis, unilateral dilated pupil.
 
Aetiology
Head injury, primary or metastatic brain tumour, bacterial meningitis, brain abscess.
 
Types
Cerebellar herniation, uncal (temporal) herniation, transtentorial herniation.

brain herniation

Neurology A pressure-induced prolapse of part of the brain into adjacent spaces, which occurs when the brain is under very high pressure Clinical Coma, paralysis, unilateral dilated pupil Etiology Head injury, 1º or metastatic brain tumor, bacterial meningitis, brain abscess Types Cerebellar herniation, uncal–temporal herniation, transtentorial herniation of the brain
References in periodicals archive ?
These structural abnormalities in CM-1 may include stretching of cranial nerves or direct compression of brain stem nuclei, compression of the posterolateral part of the medulla and the upper cervical spinal cord, vascular distortion in the territories irrigated by the vertebral and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries, and pressure on the rootlets of C1, C2, and the vagus nerves (4,5).
A compression of brain occurs in calves with hypovitaminosis A due to failure of growth and sculpturing of cranial vault to accommodate growing brain.
Although it is rare but it can create difficulty in diagnosis and management because it can be clinically silent and then patients suddenly deteriorates due to much narrow space in this area leading to increased intracranial pressure and compression of brain stem resulting in cardiac arrest and ending on sudden death.
"The findings underscore the importance of recognizing SDH, since in severe cases the blood that accumulates from these brain bleeds can cause compression of brain tissue and lead to brain damage and even death.
According to this mechanism, the main underlying cause of coma seems to be venous engorgement rather than direct compression of brain stem (2).
Compression of brain venous outflow is the simplest way to increase brain fluid volume; as the inflow of arterial blood continues, the venous pressure increases along with an increase in ICP.
The rapid pressure changes induced by the swift movement of the head and subsequent swift movement of the brain within the skull causes compression of brain tissue, as well as shearing and tearing injuries due to rotational forces acting on the neurones.