Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984

Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984

(kom-prē-hen'siv krīm kon-trōl' akt),
A standard applied to defendants tried in U.S. federal courtrooms that allows an affirmative defense, if, at the time of the crime, "the defendant, as a result of severe mental disease or deficit, was unable to appreciate the nature and quality or wrongfulness of his acts; mental disease, or defect does not otherwise constitute a defense."
See also: American Law Institute rule, Durham rule, M'Naghten rule, criminal insanity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 allowed state and local law enforcement to seize assets used for illegal activity.
But then came the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984. After its passage, "drug arrests per 100,000 population rose by 72 percent" from 1984 through 1989 (Mast, Benson, and Rasmussen 2000, p.
Congress significantly amended the statute in passing the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984. (28) The 1984 Act created a mandatory five-year sentence "for use of a firearm during a federal crime of violence." (29) Congress removed the term "unlawfully" in order to impose culpability even if the offender carried a registered gun.
(28.) See Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984, Pub.
Since the creation of the Program by the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970 (25) and amended by the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984, (26) more than 7,500 witnesses and 9,500 family members have been afforded protection, which includes establishing new identities in new locations.
The Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 imposed enhanced federal penalties on those convicted of selling drugs near schools and other places occupied by kids.
Historically, the basis for this situation was the passage of the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984. This law created the United States Sentencing Commission to address the perceived disparity in penalties for similar crimes by creating guidelines for sentencing.
[section]1963 (1988).) The Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 further expanded the government's forfeiture power by giving the government title to the proceeds of illegal drug actions upon the commission of an act giving rise to forfeiture.
The Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 (Title 18, USC Section 1203) gives the FBI investigative jurisdiction domestically and internationally where US citizens are involved.
The "other purposes,' attached by House Republicans' astute parliamentary maneuvering on the eve of the last Congressional elections, included a grab bag from prosecutorial wish lists, now known as the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984. Then-Attorney General William French Smith called this act "a historic measure, the most far-reaching, substantial reform of the Federal criminal justice system ever enacted by the Congress.' If one substitutes the neutral term "amendment' for the valuecharged "reform,' the Attorney General's description is a telling summary of what was done.
(7.) The Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 and the Anti-Ding Abuse Act of 1986 significantly strengthened and expanded the existing forfeiture provisions of prior law.
Congress addressed this time-management issue in the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 and created Title 18, U.S.
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