compound eye

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com·pound eye

the eye of arthropods, most highly developed in insects and crustaceans; the eye consists of a group of functionally related visual elements (ommatidia) with corneal surfaces that collectively form a segment of a sphere.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

compound eye

n.
The eye of most insects and some crustaceans, which is composed of many light-sensitive elements, each having its own refractive system and each forming a portion of an image.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

compound eye

see EYE, COMPOUND.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The ancestral eye then evolved into the various camera-type eyes (probably independently) and various compound eyes. Eyeless phyla are therefore degenerate or failed to develop eyespots further.
Bees have 2 large compound eyes. Many bees have 3 extra eyes that can see changes in light and dark.
This compound eye proved to possess the same kind of structure as the eyes of bees and dragonflies living today, but it lacks the lenses that are typical of modern eyes of this type," said the researchers.
For example, a study of myriapod eye growth suggests that in this group, as in the much better-studied insect compound eyes, new units are added anteriorly row by row.
Head as in nominate race, but vertex with a pair of erect spine-like horns between compound eyes. Antennae and compound eyes as in nominate race.
Although superposition compound eyes are exquisitely sensitive, they typically suffer from less sharp vision.
To human thinking, the top of a tree seems a better place for lookouts, and another kind of fan worm does grow compound eyes there.
In conclusion, we provided an extensive description of morphometric characters of the compound eyes of B.
The upside to compound eyes: They're great at detecting motion.
Compound eyes later became a shared feature of numerous arthropods.
Srinivasan says similar responses were obtained from earlier tests with bees and other insects, which have compound eyes.