chimera

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chimera

 [ki-me´rah]
an organism whose body contains different cell populations derived from different zygotes of the same or different species, occurring spontaneously or produced artificially.

chi·me·ra

(kī-mēr'ă, ki-),
1. In experimental embryology, the individual produced by grafting an embryonic part of one animal onto the embryo of another, either of the same or of another species.
2. An organism that has received a transplant of genetically and immunologically different tissue, such as bone marrow.
3. Dizygotic twins that exchange immunologically distinct types of erythrocytes.
4. A protein fusion in which two different proteins are linked through peptide bonds; usually genetically engineered. Chimeric antibodies may have the Fab fragment from one species fused with the Fc fragment from another.
5. Any macromolecule fusion formed by two or more macromolecules from different species or from different genes.
[L. Chimaera, G. Chimaira, mythic monster (lit. a she-goat)]

chimera

also

chimaera

(kī-mîr′ə, kĭ-)
n.
1.
a. An organism, organ, or part consisting of two or more tissues of different genetic composition, produced as a result of organ transplant, grafting, or genetic engineering.
b. A gene or protein consisting of parts from two different genes or proteins that are normally distinct, sometimes derived from two different species.
2. An individual who has received a transplant of genetically and immunologically different tissue.

chimera

Any individual organism or molecule derived from 2 or more species.
 
Embryology
An organism that results when an embryonic part of one organism is grafted onto another.

Genetics
An organism with 2 or more cell lines, genotypes or karyotypes descended from at least 2 zygotes. Chimeras are very rare, only occur in twins and result from chorionic vascular anastomoses, transplantations or double fertilisations and subsequent participation of both fertilised meiotic products in one developing embryo; all hermaphrodites should be karyotyped to evaluate possible chimerism.

Molecular biology
(1) An animal formed from two different embryonic sources. In mouse genetics, targeted mutations produced in embryonic stem cells are recovered by breeding chimeric mice, resulting from the mixture of embryonic stem cells with a genetically distinct blastocyst.
(2) A clone containing genomic DNA from nonadjacent genomic segments or cDNA from two different mRNAs.

Transplantation
The term chimera was once used for a person who had received transplanted tissue—e.g., bone marrow surviving in a recipient.

chi·me·ra

(kī-mēr'ă)
1. The individual produced by grafting an embryonic part of one animal onto the embryo of another, either of the same or of another species.
2. An organism that has received a transplant of genetically and immunologically different tissue, such as bone marrow.
3. Dizygotic twins that have immunologically distinct types of erythrocytes.
4. A protein fusion in which two different proteins, usually from different species, are linked through peptide bonds; usually genetically engineered. Chimeric antibodies may have the Fab fragment from one species fused with the Fc fragment from another.
5. Any macromolecule fusion formed by two or more macromolecules from different species or from different genes.
[L. Chimaera, G. Chimaira, mythic monster (lit. a she-goat)]

chimera

An organism that contains a mixture of genetically different cells derived from more than one ZYGOTE. A chimera may, for instance, occur as a result of fertilization by more than one spermatozoon; fusion of two zygotes; an ALLOGENEIC bone marrow graft; cell exchange between dizygotic twin fetuses; or combination of portions of embryos of different species. Compare MOSAICISM. The term derives from the name of a mythical monster with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail.
References in periodicals archive ?
They weren't composite creatures in the earliest Greek sources, but they were, according to Pliny, the first people to fight on horseback.
The ancient Near Eastern cosmological dragon was a composite creature. Is it too far-fetched to imagine that they equated the tannin dragon-creature with the mushussu dragon regularly represented on the Ishtar Gate and elsewhere?
This might also have prompted the author to consider meaning for the geometric shapes as well (circle or lozenge with concave sides flanked by genii, animals, or composite creatures, e.g., Til Barsip Rooms 21, 22, 25, 26, 46), especially in light of Reade's reading of the glazed brick wall panel from Fort Shalmaneser (J.
A second piece, Armypullo (Number 4) (2002), is from the Animalloys series of composite creatures, assembled from collectible marketing incentives distributed in cigarette packages during the 1930s by an English tobacco company.
In addition, it has been argued that the photobionts are physiologically more important than the mycobiont in sustaining each of the composite creatures. Some scientists have therefore suggested the creation of a new taxonomic term (and status) for these symbiotic complexes.
We meet the 'monster' everywhere in medieval culture in the strange composite creatures of the Luttrell Psalter, the grinning gargoyles rimming cathedrals and churches, and in the dog-heads and sciapods and other 'monstrous forms' who stalk the borders of mappae mundi.
Accordingly, we see how the willfully contrived composite creatures pictured by sculptors as well as painters, those inevitably grotesque and monstrous hybrids wholly engendered by their vocational fantasia, had long since implicitly become a standard symbol for artistic license and freedom.