competition

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com·pe·ti·tion

(kom'pĕ-tish'ŭn),
The process by which the activity or presence of one substance interferes with, or suppresses, the activity of another substance with similar affinities.

competition

/com·pe·ti·tion/ (kom″pĕ-tish´un) the phenomenon in which two structurally similar molecules “compete” for a single binding site on a third molecule.compet´itive
antigenic competition  an altered response to an immunogen resulting from the simultaneous or close administration of two immunogens: the response to one is normal, while the response to the second is suppressed or diminished.

com·pe·ti·tion

(kom'pĕ-tish'ŭn)
The process by which the activity or presence of one substance interferes with, or suppresses, the activity of another substance with similar affinities.

competition

the interaction between organisms striving for the same end, including competition for resources (food, living space), mates, etc. Such interaction may adversely affect their growth and survival. See INTERSPECIFIC COMPETITION, INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adam Alper and Mike De Vries, IP lawyers at Kirkland & Ellis, recently sat down with Inside Counsel to discuss the significance of competitor cases in the IP world.
In addition, data should be collected to understand the net price being charged by your competitors, not just the sticker price, because sticker price discounts can vary widely from institution to institution.
In health care, the key forces are rivalry among present competitors (e.
Several test runs by Top Fuel competitors were in the low 4.
Coca Cola would lose the differentiating capability that helps them earn abnormal profits in comparison to its competitors.
The competition format asks competitors to submit their concept ideas in Stage I, and for a jury to select three competitors who will receive an honorarium to produce more detailed designs in Stage II.
Many account executives and salespeople assume that they know and understand competitor offerings based on anecdotal and other casually obtained information.
Below, we discuss the importance of judging the competitive similarities and differences between firms and their competitors when firms perform competitive analysis and formulate strategies.
Though Microsoft will be barred from retaliatory pricing schemes and from barring or trying to prevent competitors from shipping machines with non-Windows OSes, these strictures were expected.
These findings emphasize that business communicators need an effective means of obtaining, analyzing and evaluating strategic intelligence about competitors and the industry in which they do business--information that clearly helps communicators understand the plans and actions of competitors (and others) and, as a result, helps them make their own effective, competitive plans and take action.