interspecific competition

(redirected from Competing species)

interspecific competition

any limited COMPETITION between two or more different species populations for a resource such as food. All populations involved are negatively affected by the competition, and may exhibit increased mortality or decreased birthrate. see COMPETITION.
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In addition, measures must be taken to limit use of the boxes by competing species as well as intrusion by predators.
In the first condition, divided pots, the culture stayed in a compartment and the competing species in another.
The author models the combined effects of intra-specific competition and facilitation between the individuals of a single species, and develops a paradigmatic competing species model with a protected zone for one of the species to illustrate how large solutions and metasolutions play a pivotal role in describing the dynamics of spatially heterogeneous systems.
The effect of this lethal partnership was to cause what biologists call a "crash," which led to the extinctions of the competing species.
Studies of competitive exclusion and resource partitioning in teleost fishes (Hixon, 1980; Ross, 1986) have found that habitat partitioning could be related to high dietary overlap among competing species or to interactive competition, when competing species have the same preference for prey species (Jansen et al.
Over the past 70 to 80 years we've seen an encroachment of Douglas fir in the valley/forestland interface, where there's a constant battle among competing species.
This involved a process of continuous adaptation and counter-adaptation in the two competing species, host and pathogen, rendering gut immunocompetence a complex trait with a large genetic component.
It showed how a planet with two competing species of dark- and light-colored daisies could regulate its surface temperature with extraordinary accuracy and home in automatically on the most favorable temperature for daisy growth.
Various evidence suggests that people's hunting, setting fires and bringing competing species to the islands caused the big birds' demise.
Among rodents, Grant (1972) suggested that competition leads to inverse spatial distributions on a micro habitat scale, which in turn promotes the long term stable coexistence of the competing species.
In nature two competing species do not face a straight battle and there may be other species too which have their own impact on the competition.
This is because there is enough environmental heterogeneity within the community to produce microsites and microtimes when even the poorly competing species can recruit well.