compartment syndrome

(redirected from Compartment syndromes)

com·part·ment syn·drome

a condition in which increased pressure in a confined anatomic space adversely affects the circulation and threatens the function and viability of the structures therein.

compartment syndrome

(kəm-pärt′mənt)
n.
A condition characterized by increased pressure within a confined space, such as a muscle compartment, resulting in reduced blood flow, pain, and, if untreated, necrosis and functional impairment.

compartment syndrome

Etymology: L, com + partiri, to share
1 Acute: a pathological condition caused by elevation of tissue pressure within a closed space, resulting in the progressive development of compression and consequent reduction of blood supply. The compression may result from swelling within an overly restrictive dressing or cast or from nonexpansive muscle fascia. Clinical manifestations include swelling, restriction of movement, brown urine, myoglobinuria, vascular compromise, and severe pain or lack of sensation. Severe pain may appear out of proportion to the injury and is one of the earliest manifestations of this emergency situation. It can result in a permanent contracture deformity of the hand or foot, with or without a fracture. In severe cases, it can lead to necrosis and necessitate the amputation of an extremity. Treatment includes elevation, removal of restrictive dressings or casts, and potentially a surgical decompression or open fasciotomy. See also Volkmann's contracture.
2 Chronic: A pathological condition caused by elevation of tissue pressure within a closed space (compartment) during exercise. Clinical manifestations are pain in the affected extremity (usually the lower legs) and occasional numbness. Symptoms are relieved by rest and will recur with renewed exercising. This condition is not a medical emergency and is treated by eliminating the aggravating activities or limited fasciotomy.
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Anterior compartment syndrome
A symptom complex caused by ischaemia, trauma—fractures, inflammation—or infection of a closed anatomic space, resulting in compression of nerves, blood vessels, or tendons that traverse the space
Management Early therapy—fasciotomy is crucial as end-stage disease requires major reconstructive surgery to salvage function

compartment syndrome

Compressive syndrome Orthopedics A symptom complex caused by ischemia, trauma–fractures, inflammation or infection of a closed anatomic space, resulting in compression of nerves, blood vessels, or tendons that traverse the space Clinical Numbness, paresthesias, pain or loss of movement of an extremity Management Early therapy–fasciotomy is crucial as end-stage disease requires major reconstructive surgery to salvage function. See Carpal tunnel syndrome, Tarsal tunnel syndrome.

com·part·ment syn·drome

(kŏm-pahrt'mĕnt sin'drōm)
Condition in which increased intramuscular pressure in a confined anatomic space, brought on by overactivity or trauma, impedes blood flow and function of tissues within that space.
Synonym(s): compression syndrome (2) .

compartment syndrome

The effects of tissue swelling within a compartment of the body, usually the forearm or the lower leg. There is compression of the blood vessels and resulting muscle atrophy. Operation to open up the tissue planes and relieve the pressure may be urgently needed.

Compartment syndrome

Compartment syndrome is a condition in which a muscle swells but is constricted by the connective tissue around it, which cuts off blood supply to the muscle.
Mentioned in: Fractures

com·part·ment syn·drome

(kŏm-pahrt'mĕnt sin'drōm)
Condition in which increased pressure in a confined anatomic space adversely affects circulation and threatens function and viability of structures therein.

compartment

a part of the body as a whole and divided from the rest by a physical partition.

fluid compartment
that liquid part of the body excluded by cell membranes. Includes intravascular and intercellular compartments.
compartment syndrome
muscles which are contained in an aponeurotic sheath may be subjected to serious ischemia as a result of increase in the size of the muscle as a result of vigorous muscular activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Jaffray described compartment syndromes as "disastrous", adding: "You have converted a stable situation into uncontrolled chaos.
Overall, maximum neurovascular injuries and compartment syndromes were seen with fractures of tibia and fibula.
The cases involve amputations/fingertip injuries, anesthesia and pain management, arthritis, burns, compartment syndromes, congenital conditions, contractures, Dupuytren contracture, fractures/dislocations/nonunions/malunions, infections/bites, infections/extracasations, instability, osteonecrosis, peripheral nerve issues, soft tissue defects, tenosynovitis, traumatic injuries to the tendon, tumors, and vascular conditions, with each case including a description of the problem, key anatomy, workup, treatment, alternatives, principles and pearls, and pitfalls.
Clinical findings are similar to those of other compartment syndromes such as excessive pain (usually out of proportion to the injury), paresthesia, and tense compartments.
Double-incision fasciotomy of the leg for decompression in compartment syndromes.
An increasingly recognised complication of the resuscitation of patients with severe burns is the development of compartment syndromes, including that affecting the abdomen.
Lower leg pain: diagnosis and treatment of compartment syndromes and other pain syndromes of the leg.
Compartment syndromes not managed emergently may cause extensive muscle damage and even loss of limb (Brown, Greenhalgh, Kagan, & Warden, 1994).
Lower leg pain--diagnoses and treatment of compartment syndromes and other pain syndromes of the leg.
2-7) Compartment syndromes may be a cause or a complication of rhabdomyolysis.