Drosophila melanogaster

(redirected from Common fruit fly)
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Related to Common fruit fly: Fruit flies

Drosophila melanogaster

A genus of fruit flies used extensively in the study of genetics. The development of the chromosome theory of heredity was largely the outcome of research on this species.
See also: Drosophila
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, August 11 ( ANI ): A developmental geneticist has used a common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) to probe the question as to why the propagation of every animal on the planet is the result of sexual activity between males and females of a given species.
A Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at the University of California, Berkeley, the biologist laid a few wagers on a subject he knows extraordinarily well: the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.
The original experiment on Drosophila melanogaster, also known as the common fruit fly, was performed by creating multiple, isolated populations with either five males and five females or three of each gender in a jar.
Two research teams now report unearthing these elusive proteins in Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly studied in many laboratories.
Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly that swirls around browning bananas in your kitchen, is an important biological model system.
Kane's remark about flies refers to the extraordinary success developmental biologists have had with Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly. Last year, for example, a Nobel prize honored three researchers who in the 1970s studied mutant fruit flies in which embryogenesis has gone awry (SN: 10/14/95, p.
That's where model organisms like Drosophila melanogaster (the common fruit fly) shine.
Anupama Dahanukar and her team from the University of California, Riverside, examined the feeding preference of the common fruit fly for beer and other products of yeast fermentation.
Washington, Aug 9 (ANI): Scientists have for the first time identified a new gene that is required for memory formation in Drosophila, the common fruit fly.
Al-Anzi and his colleagues developed an assay to examine feeding behavior in the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.