myrrh

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myrrh

(mer),
A gum resin from Commiphora molmol and C. abyssinica (family Burseraceae) and other species of C., a shrub of Arabia and eastern Africa; used as an astringent, tonic, and stimulant, and locally for diseases of the oral cavity and in mouthwashes; thought to have been used in ancient Egyptian medicine and embalming.
[G. myrrha]

myrrh 1

(mûr)
n.
An aromatic gum resin obtained from several trees and shrubs of the genus Commiphora of northeastern Africa and Arabia, used in perfume, incense, and medicinal preparations.

myrrh 2

(mûr)
n.
See sweet cicely.

myrrh

Herbal medicine
A flowering plant that contains volatile oils (cinamaldehyde, cuminaldehyde, eugenol, heerabolene, limonene, pinene and others), resin and gum; it is antifungal, antiseptic, astringent, cardiotonic and expectorant. Myrrh has been used as a mouthwash for sore throats and laryngitis; topically for athlete’s foot, wounds and as a mosquito repellent; and internally for asthma, colds, coughs, chest congestion and sinusitis. Some data suggest that myrrh may lower cholesterol and reduce blood clot formation.
 
Toxicity
Myrrh should not be used in pregnancy or in those with renal failure.

myrrh

(mĕr)
A gum resin from Commiphora molmol and C. abyssinica (family Burseraceae) and other species, used as an astringent, tonic, and stimulant, and locally for diseases of the oral cavity and in mouthwashes; thought to have been used in ancient Egyptian medicine and embalming.
[G. myrrha]

myrrh

a resin derived from plants of the genus Commiophora.

myrrh

(mĕr)
Gum resin used as an astringent, tonic, and stimulant, and locally for diseases of oral cavity and in mouthwashes.
[G. myrrha]
References in periodicals archive ?
Cytotoxicity activity of extracts and compounds from Commiphora myrrha resin against human gynecologic cancer cells.
The oleo-gum-resins of Boswellia carteri and Commiphora myrrha (500 gm each) were separately placed in round bottom flasks, covered with sufficient water and subjected to hydrodistillation in a modified Likens and Nickerson apparatus [12].
Each of the petroleum ether extracts of the oleogum-resins of Boswellia carteri and Commiphora myrrha was refluxed separately for 6 hrs with 0.5 N alcoholic potassium hydroxide (60 mL) for saponification in a boiling water bath.
White female albino rats of 150 g average body weight were used to test the anti-inflammatory activity of the previously prepared successive extracts (petroleum ether, ether, chloroform, methanolic and 50% aqueous methanolic) and the volatile oils prepared from both Boswellia carteri and Commiphora myrrha oleo-gum-resins.
One group served as control, six groups designated (B) were used as test groups for Boswellia carteri extracts and six groups designated (C) were used as test groups for Commiphora myrrha extracts and the last group served as the control group and was not given any treatment.
Male and female albino mice of 21-25 g body weight were fed with progressively increasing oral doses (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 g/kg mice body weight) of each of the non-polar extract of Boswellia carteri and the chloroformic successive extract of Commiphora myrrha oleo-gum-resins for testing acute lethal toxicity.
The chloroformic extract of Commiphora myrrha oleogum-resin showed highest anti-inflammatory activity with percentages of inhibition 73, 62, 66, 72, 76 and 62% at time intervals of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4 hours respectively.
GC/MS analysis of the unsaponifiable matter (USM) of Boswellia carteri and Commiphora myrrha oleo-gum-resins was carried out and the identification of the constituents was performed by comparison of the spectral fragmentation patterns with those of the available database libraries Wiley (Wiley Int.) USA, published data (Adams, 1995) and the published spectral data of the previously isolated compounds from the same and related species.
The analysis of the methylated fatty acids of the petroleum ether extract of the oleo-gum-resin of Commiphora myrrha resulted in the identification of twelve fatty acid methyl esters representing 74.83% and a single tricyclo-ketonic hydrocarbon 1-carbomethoxy-tricyclo[8.4.0]tetradec-2-en-12-one representing 20.19%.
In case of Commiphora myrrha oleo-gum-resin, the results of the acute anti-inflammatory test revealed that the chloroformic extract showed the highest significant anti-inflammatory activity with percentages of inhibition 73, 62, 66, 72, 76 and 62% with significance p<0.001 at time intervals of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4 hours respectively.