commensal

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commensal

 [kŏ-men´sal]
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl),
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

commensal

(kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

com·men′sal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

commensal

adjective Referring to a relationship in which one organism lives near, on or within another organism, and derives benefit therof without injuring or benefiting the other.

noun Commensal organism, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl)
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

commensal

A micro-organism that lives continuously on, or in certain parts of, the body, without causing disease. Commensals sometimes exclude more dangerous organisms, but may cause disease if they gain access to parts of the body other than their normal habitat.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

commensal

(of an organism) living in close association with another organism of a different species where neither has an obvious effect on the other. Examples are some POLYCHAETE worms that live in the tubes of others, and certain bacteria that live on human skin. See SYMBIOSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Jesus brings forth commensality as the unifying and founding practice of a ritual of radical communion, where his own body, symbolically, is given to the guests according to Christian ritual.
Sharing food at home and school: perspectives on commensality. Sociol Rev.
ancestry, commensality, thanksgiving, possession of the Spirit?
In sum, the evidence shows how the piper can symbolize commensality and the symposium as a performer of the indispensable aulos.
A potent source of male energy and power, food provides the fuel necessary for knightly action, while commensality strengthens the fraternal bonds that underpin Camelot's civic society.
Zucker's primary research is ethnographic: she conducted a ground-up study of local interactions, based on an extended stay in the pseudonymous village of O'Thmaa, that looks at the most basic forms of sociality: kinship, food, commensality, and life cycle and other ritual practices.
Although many Cherith Brook residents and volunteers themselves prefer a vegetarian diet, the vegetarian option invokes a tension of commensality. One worker commented,
Through elaborations of etiquette and rules of commensality, it entails echoes of historic patterns of domination that ill accord with the classic nation-state representations of citizen equality.
Together, these policies use the commensality of hunger (a shared diet) and the hope it generates to foreground a vision of sharing of plenty.