commensal

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Related to Commensality: swayed, Sound symbolism, embarkation

commensal

 [kŏ-men´sal]
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl),
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.

commensal

/com·men·sal/ (kom-men´sil)
1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host.
2. a parasite that causes no harm to the host.

commensal

(kə-mĕn′səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected.
n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

com·men′sal·ly adv.

commensal

[kəmen′səl]
Etymology: L, com, together, imensa, table
(two different species) living together in an arrangement that is not harmful to either and that may be beneficial to both. Some bacteria in the digestive tract of humans aid in the processing of food and produce B vitamins needed for normal health while causing no harm (normal flora). Compare parasite, synergist.

commensal

adjective Referring to a relationship in which one organism lives near, on or within another organism, and derives benefit therof without injuring or benefiting the other.

noun Commensal organism, see there.

com·men·sal

(kŏ-men'săl)
1. Pertaining to or characterized by commensalism.
2. An organism participating in commensalism.

commensal

A micro-organism that lives continuously on, or in certain parts of, the body, without causing disease. Commensals sometimes exclude more dangerous organisms, but may cause disease if they gain access to parts of the body other than their normal habitat.

commensal

(of an organism) living in close association with another organism of a different species where neither has an obvious effect on the other. Examples are some POLYCHAETE worms that live in the tubes of others, and certain bacteria that live on human skin. See SYMBIOSIS.

commensal

organism with a symbiotic host relationship; the organism derives benefit and the host is unharmed

commensal

1. living on or within another organism, and deriving benefit without harming or benefiting the host individual.
2. a parasitic organism that causes no harm to the host.
References in periodicals archive ?
When our sources tell us that pornai, hetairai, or hired entertainers were present for commensality, they seem uninterested in carefully distinguishing the status of the women.
Claude Grignon defines commensality as "a gathering aimed to accomplish in a collective way some material tasks and symbolic obligations linked to the satisfaction of a biological individual need.
The expansion of the concept of enskilment evidenced through Gisili Palsson's (1994) work with Icelandic fishermen and Heather Paxson's (2010) work on cheesemaking and terroir will help to better contextualize enskilment within the confines of food production and commensality.
Among their perspectives are an overview of the social meaning of ritual food and drink consumption, feasting and social dynamics in the Epipaleolithic of the Fertile Crescent, feasting in late Neolithic Britain, the social and symbolic context of commensality rituals in the Bell Beakers of the interior of Iberia 2500-2000 cal BC, staple foods and ritual practices in the Phoenician diaspora, and consumption relations in the northern Iberian household.
This study by Jordan D, Rosenblum, University of Wisconsin, of "how the Tannaitic movement constructed identity through regulating culinary and commensal practices" relies on the Tannaite compilations for data to describe the processes of identity definition, "analyzing the interlocking dimensions of identity formation and commensality regulation that can be applied cross-culturally" (p.
Yet historians of North America have by and large left unexplored the role and meaning of commensality, of eating and drinking together.
Taylor warns against assuming that a "household" is a space for the coincidence of coresidence, commensality, family-relations, and domestic economy: for remote Aborigines these four processes are frequently dissociated, the work of different, if overlapping, ensembles whose locus is not necessarily a single dwelling.
Men's disgust and fear over Sara's meat-eating reveal a barrier to full commensality in early twentieth-century Britain.
The term expresses both a Kadazan notion of commensality, connected with traditional values of equality and hospitality, and the pleasure deriving from it, and the actual social gatherings in which it is practised.
In both texts, the evocation of ritual encounters--the quotidian rites of commensality, aggregation, and congregation, the rites by which life-cycle events are solemnized--provides the framework for an examination of the ways in which family and, in the case of L'Enterrement, the wider social group attempt to accommodate an event that radically transgresses the codes within which it normally operates.
According to Crossan, the term "Kingdom of God" was the "process of open commensality of a non-discriminating table in miniature of a non-discriminating society" (p.
Such expanded ideas of commensality may be mostly imagined--cooking food from an unfamiliar region does not automatically entail eating socially with others from that part of the world--but, as Benedict Anderson's classic argument suggests, imagined communities are far from chimerical.