commensalism

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commensalism

 [kŏ-men´sal-izm]
symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm),
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed; for example, Entamoeba coli in the human large intestine. Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism.
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

/com·men·sal·ism/ (-izm) symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

commensalism

(kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

commensalism

[kəmen′səliz′əm]
a symbiosis in which one species benefits but the other species is neither helped nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm)
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed.
Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the identification process, specimens are analyzed for appropriateness to determine if they represent a true disease process or if they contain large numbers of commensal flora that might compromise accurate interpretation of results.
Bacteria with increased mutation frequency and antibiotic resistance are enriched in the commensal flora of patients with high antibiotic usage.
Clarithromycin treatment selects for persistent macrolide-resistant bacteria in throat commensal flora.
When infections are treated with an antimicrobial agent, all bacteria in the host are affected, including the commensal flora, which could result in the selection of resistant commensals, particularly in children who are administered oral antimicrobial drugs too frequently.
We assessed the quantitative contribution of pig farming to antimicrobial resistance in the commensal flora of pig farmers by comparing 113 healthy pig farmers from the major French porcine production areas to 113 nonfarmers, each matched for sex, age, and county of residence.
Any type of recent antibiotic treatment (not only [beta]-lactam agents) can select PNSP by inhibiting susceptible commensal flora and eradicating penicillin-susceptible pneumococci, thereby indirectly promoting the transmission of PNSP and increasing the prevalence of PNSP in a community or country (9).
Due to the increasing human impact on nature, including the impact on its plant component, the actual problem is the study of the natural vegetation synanthropization processes, commensal floras development and the formation of anthropogenic flora and the development of anthropogenic plant communities [1].