commensalism

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commensalism

 [kŏ-men´sal-izm]
symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm),
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed; for example, Entamoeba coli in the human large intestine. Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism.
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

/com·men·sal·ism/ (-izm) symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

commensalism

(kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

commensalism

[kəmen′səliz′əm]
a symbiosis in which one species benefits but the other species is neither helped nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm)
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed.
Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearly there is a connection between a healthy functioning immune system and a healthy balance of commensal bacteria.
Commensal bacteria regulate toll-like receptor 3-dependent inflammation after skin injury.
oralis a tissue associated with commensal bacteria had higher susceptibility than that of S.
18) Studies in germ-free mice, which are bred in a sterile environment and lack a microbiome, suggest that commensal bacteria can alter gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells.
Lactobacillus classified as an important category in LAB which prevalently found as commensal bacteria and is utilized as a prebiotic for humans and animals (Tajabadi et al.
Indiscriminate use of antibiotic during chicken rearing results in development of drug resistance in commensal bacteria of GIT.
In addition to their effect on the body's immune response, commensal bacteria enhance skin health by inhibiting pathogen growth.
The work will investigate the association between the host model Drosophila melanogaster and one of its most abundant commensal bacteria, Lactobacillus plantarum, which was demonstrated to be beneficial to its host physiology by promoting juvenile growth and maturation.
They also come into contact with a particularly complex frontier where the immune system must distinguish between commensal bacteria that normally colonize human intestines, and foreign microbes that cause disease.
Transfer of resistance genes may occur through horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from commensal bacteria to opportunistic pathogens, as previously described CTX-M extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) resistance genes, which originate from Kluyvera sp.