combustion

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combustion

 [kom-bus´chun]
rapid oxidation with emission of heat.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

com·bus·tion

(kom-bŭs'chŭn),
Burning, the rapid oxidation of any substance accompanied by the production of heat and light.
[L. comburo, pp. -bustus, to burn up]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

com·bus·tion

(kŏm-bŭs'chŭn)
Burning; rapid oxidation of any substance accompanied by the production of heat and light.
[L. comburo, pp. -bustus, to burn up]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This eight week course consists of engineering fundamentals, shop safety, precision measuring and special tools, lubricants and cleaning agents, internal combustion theory, electrical and fuel systems, preventive maintenance and troubleshooting, gear case, and power head overhaul.
From the outset, the course has been a drinking-from-a-firehose intense indoctrination not just in engine operation, but also in the esoteric little world of combustion theory. Students learn all the basics--fuel and induction theory, ignition timing, flame front propagation, stoichiometry and so on, all in the context of intelligent engine operation.
Laboratory testing and combustion theory has shown that simply selecting a maximum Wobbe Index is insufficient to address incomplete combustion over a range of gas compositions (especially for natural gas with heating values in excess of about 1,100 Btu/scf.
Mathematical combustion theory and terrestrial experiments show that there are two basic types of explosion.
Li, Combustion Theory and Technology, China Electric Power Press, Beijing, China, 2011.