martial arts

(redirected from Combat arts)
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Any physical and mental discipline based on self-defense, intended to achieve self-awareness and expression in movement; some Asian martial arts evolved from ritual dances, or exercises intended to relieve tension caused by hours of meditation
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

martial arts

Budo Health enhancement Any physical and mental discipline based on self-defense, intended to achieve self-awareness and expression in movement; some Asian MAs evolved from ritual dances, or exercises intended to relieve tension caused by hrs of meditation. See Aikido, Chi kung–qi gong, T'ai chi ch'uan.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Martial arts

Group of diverse activities originating from the ancient fighting techniques of the Orient.
Mentioned in: Qigong
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, in summary, the null hypothesis about these combat sciences having to be disguised as a dance cannot be taken at face value due to the fact that 1) there was already a strong association between dance and combative arts/sciences in Africa as shown in example (5) and 2) there were cases of both repression and encouragement of combat arts and sciences and--in the cases of encouragement--it would not make sense to say that they had to be hidden from those who were already aware and, to whatever degree, encouraging of their practice.
Further, I argue that part of the confusion with regard to the dance/fight conundrum at hand is that modern authors and practitioners are looking at our combative traditions from the premises of asking whether they were repressed or not repressed; in other words, their understanding is based on a question of whether combat arts and sciences were concealed or not.
The parallel to be drawn here is that, although we can find abundant instances of overt repression of combat arts and sciences, when the drum changes, the dance should also change.
This is to say, in the present more than in the past, our combat arts and sciences are hidden right before our very eyes, with their latent inherent potential and effectiveness unlocked.