saturation

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saturation

 [sach″er-a´shun]
the state of being saturated, or the act of saturating.
oxygen saturation the amount of oxygen bound to hemoglobin in the blood, expressed as a percentage of the maximal binding capacity.

sat·u·ra·tion

(satch'ŭ-rā'shŭn),
1. Impregnation of one substance by another to the greatest possible extent.
See also: saturation pulse.
2. Neutralization, as of an acid by an alkali.
See also: saturation pulse.
3. That concentration of a dissolved substance that cannot be exceeded.
See also: saturation pulse.
4. In optics, see saturated color.
See also: saturation pulse.
5. Filling of all available sites on an enzyme molecule by its substrate, or on a hemoglobin molecule by oxygen (symbol SO2) or carbon monoxide (symbol SCO).
See also: saturation pulse.
6. In MRI, a temporary state in which there is no net magnetization of the spins; can be induced with special radiofrequency pulses. Saturated tissues emit no signal when sampled; partially saturated tissues do, however, emit a weak signal.
See also: saturation pulse.
[L. saturatio, fr. saturo, to fill, fr. satis, enough]

saturation

Occupational medicine A measure of the maximum amount of a particular task a person can perform. See Task saturation.

sat·u·ra·tion

(sach'ŭr-ā'shŭn)
1. Impregnation of one substance by another to the greatest possible extent.
2. Neutralization, as of an acid by an alkali.
3. The concentration of a dissolved substance that cannot be exceeded.
4. optics seesaturated color
5. Filling of all the available sites on an enzyme molecule by its substrate, or on a hemoglobin molecule by oxygen (symbol SO2) or carbon monoxide (symbol SCO).
[L. saturatio, fr. saturo, to fill, fr. satis, enough]

saturation 

Attribute of a visual sensation, which permits a judgment to be made of the proportion of pure chromatic colour in the total sensation. Note: This attribute is the psychosensorial correlate, or nearly so, of the colorimetric quantity purity (CIE).

sat·u·ra·tion

(sach'ŭr-ā'shŭn)
1. Impregnation of one substance by another to the greatest possible extent.
2. Neutralization, as of an acid by an alkali.
3. That concentration of a dissolved substance that cannot be exceeded.
[L. saturatio, fr. saturo, to fill, fr. satis, enough]

Patient discussion about saturation

Q. I am wondering if any of you are ENTHUSED about the use of COCONUT OIL. I ask because it IS SATURATED FAT. I have trouble losing weight. That inculdes getting cold frequently, and was wondering if cocounut oil would help me maintain body temperture more easily. Also, I have notice that SOME claim that coconut oil has many health benefits not affiliated with polyunsaturates.

A. i know there was a Polynesian research about people that consume coconut oil on a daily basis in parallel to people who don't. they found out that there are high cholesterol levels among the people that consumed coconut oil but no significant difference in heart problems.

More discussions about saturation
References in periodicals archive ?
Expectedly, and consistent with the above research, we found that wines made from ripe fruit had higher color saturation, more fruit-forward aromas, less vegetal and earthy aromas, less sourness and a more viscous mouthfeel (but not less astringency than wines made from unripe fruit (see "Sensory Attributes of the 2011 Merlot Harvest).
Increased color saturation is usually "preferred." If there are color saturation differences between identical objects under two different light sources, people will tend to prefer the light source under which the color saturation of most objects is somewhat greater (although not too much), if all other things are equal (Figure 3).
The goal was to get one good default (original) picture and then vary it high/low in the six properties (color saturation, shadow intensity, contrasts, gleam, texture scaling) to finally end up with 13 images.
Despite consumer bias for higher resolution, DLP is far superior when it comes to contrast ratio and color saturation of picture quality, meaning that DLP projectors with half the resolution of LCOS projectors deliver a better picture.
One of these enhancements is better color saturation, resulting in prints that look richer and brighter and is most noticeable in photos with a large amount of yellow and red in them.
This multimedia projector uses three LCD panels to project a wide variety of computer and video images with rich color saturation and full-time color.
LCD projectors deliver better color saturation, sharper images, are slim and weigh less than four pounds.
"His `Museum' pictures especially are masterpieces of observation that reach a sublime level of color saturation and detail that, to my eye, are unequaled except in painting."
The material could also be used for solid-state lighting applications based on electroluminescent layers, as the new material leads to significant enhancement of brightness at improved color saturation.
De Villa and lenser Claudio Chea push DV's color saturation to intensify the particular emotional tone of each locale.
Where the glass is thicker, color saturation is greater.
The brightness, color saturation and clarity of the image is outstanding.