colonial

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colonial

(kə-lō′nē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, possessing, or inhabiting a colony or colonies.
2. Living in, consisting of, or forming a colony: colonial organisms.

co·lo′ni·al·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trends in psychiatry were important, but the Algerian war was the crucial factor in the revision of French colonial psychiatry, the final arc in the "grand curve.
Bennani therefore urges a reconsideration of French colonial history: if we want to "open an intercultural field of thought," we have to stop putting the past "on trial.
Unlike many of his more nationalist colleagues, who would deny the legitimacy of any vestiges of French colonial rule in North Africa, Bennani cautions against reactionary tendencies.
The psychoanalytic community centered around Laforgue's group in Casablanca closed its ranks nearly as tightly as had orthodox psychiatry--only three Moroccan psychoanalysts practiced under colonial rule, and only in the last years of the protectorate--but Bennani argues that the political implications of this institutional "softening" should encourage Moroccans to examine the history of psychoanalysis with "reasoned critique" rather than reactionary polemics.
Rene Collignon, for example, begins an article on French psychiatry in colonial Senegal with a promising historical contextualization.
Studies of colonial psychiatry must go beyond the racism formula.
Ernst, of course, focuses on the European population, while Vaughn, McCulloch, and Sadowsky are careful to specify that not only indigenous populations constituted a "problem" for British colonial psychiatrists.
This begs the question of Europeans in the history of French colonial psychiatry, a group that none of the French historians mentions.
The implications of these traditions for colonial contact in the psychiatric hospital merits historians' attention.
Despite the considerable information these studies have uncovered, the existing scholarship has only scratched the surface of the rich stores contained in the history of colonial psychiatry.
Second, they explore the relationship between knowledge and power in the colonial context that the pre-occupied scholars since the publication of Edward Said's Orientalism in 1978.
Patricia Lorcin, Imperial Identities: Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Race in Colonial Algeria (London, 1995), provides the best example.