colonial

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colonial

(kə-lō′nē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, possessing, or inhabiting a colony or colonies.
2. Living in, consisting of, or forming a colony: colonial organisms.

co·lo′ni·al·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
If social scientists defended colonial abuses by reference to the civilizing mission, engineers and other applied scientists argued that their work assisted in the "mise en valeur" of colonial possessions: major projects brought colonial backwaters into the modern age.
As psychiatry occupies a unique space between the social and natural sciences, the discipline constitutes a crucial locus for study of the relationship between knowledge and power in colonial domination.
Although laying a psychoanalytic grid over historical evidence can be informative, this methodology often proves limiting, and reveals far less about the psychology of the colonial predicament than it obscures.
The historiography of colonial psychiatry has thus opened up fascinating new directions for studying the history of psychiatry and medicine, the history of science and technology under colonialism, and the ramifications of colonial social structures for human psychology.
Although disciplinary prejudices inform many of these works, collectively they bring important historical problems to light, while indicating promising directions for further inquiry into the social, cultural, medical, and political dimensions of colonial psychiatry.
At its inception in late eighteenth-century India, British colonial psychiatry was preoccupied with Europeans' psychological capacity to live "under Oriental light," as Waltraud Ernst demonstrates in Mad Tales from the Raj: The European Insane in British India, 1800-1858.
Though the number of patients confined and treated was tiny, it "contributed to the maintenance of the self-image of the British as a superior people whose charitable humanitarianism and rational, scientific achievements made colonial rule appear morally beneficial and legitimate.
Therefore while Ernst says little about the effects of colonial psychiatry on Indians (who, she acknowledges, constituted the majority of patients), Mad Tales deepens our understanding of race in the Indian colonial context by demonstrating the lengths to which Company and later Government officials went to preserve the illusion of white psychological autonomy.
29) Instead, just as Ernst has not ed that discourses about insanity reached far beyond statistical "truth" in discussions of class and race in colonial India, she needs to consider that discourses about gender might have done the same.
This could have been "an implicit imperialist strategy" that aimed "towards conceptual homogenization and the creation of 'imagined communities'" that contrasted "gentlemanly colonial power" to a "feminine Orient.
Did the shock of the Mutiny, which precipitated so many drastic shifts in colonial policy, also encourage the study of "indigenous mentalities"?
Yet Conroy is compelling in his finding that Massachusetts' public houses were a significant part of the social and cultural changes that shaped the Bay Colony as it moved from colonial to independent status and, more significantly, as elite rule adjusted to the rise of a vibrant popular culture.