colony

(redirected from Colonial era)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

colony

 [kol´o-ne]
a discrete group of organisms, as a collection of bacteria in a culture.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē),
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

colony

(kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. colo·nies
1. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
2. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

col·o·ny

(kol'ŏ-nē)
1. A group of cells growing on a solid nutrient surface, each arising from the multiplication of an individual cell; a clone.
2. A group of people with similar interests, living in a particular location or area.
[L. colonia, a colony]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

colony

A local growth of large numbers of micro-organisms derived from one individual (a clone) or from a small number. A visible growth of bacteria or other microorganisms on a nutrient medium in a culture plate.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

colony

  1. an aggregated group of separate organisms such as birds, which have come together for a specific purpose such as breeding.
  2. a group of incompletely separated individuals organised in associations, as in some hydrozoan COELENTRATES and polyzoans.
  3. a localized population of microorganisms, e.g. bacteria, derived from a single cell grown in culture.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
From the towns of Bay to Pakil are impressive Spanish colonial era churches with ancient wall paintings and antiques.
Finally, and perhaps most interestingly, Brian Bernards discusses the respective perceptions, expectations, and biases of Mainland Chinese and the overseas Chinese in Southeast Asia in Sinophone literature, which reflects the changing relationship between both groups during the colonial era, the building of nation-states, and the Cold War in Southeast Asia.
While the word brings to memory the famous Bollywood blockbuster starring Amitabh Bachchan in which a coolie becomes the epitome of sacrifice and heroism, By Mail Today Bureau in New Delhi the practice had its roots in the colonial era when Britain and other European countries abolished the slave trade in their lands but funnelled workers in labour- intensive industries such as plantations and railway by the medium of a trade in indentured labourers.
It focuses on energy projects in Uganda and Kenya and draws upon a variety of colonial era reports to document European perceptions of the low level of African demand for electricity.
The Mau Mau have just won a protracted legal claim for the inconceivable colonial era atrocities and ruthlessness at the hands of a brutal British colonial era regime.
The landmines, planted on Algeria's eastern borders with Tunisia and western with Morocco, are dated back to the French colonial era, Algerian army command noted in a statement, adding that the specialized units were able to demine around 4,441.
Largely inherited from the colonial era, today's terminology is an obstacle to accurately describing what is now known about early America.
It is important to note that the book's subtitle may mislead readers who conclude that its narrative is limited to the colonial era. Not at all: it is about how the changes in the colonial era have over-determined the chances and challenges of the Igbo people in post-colonial Nigeria and the rest of the world.
AMERICAN ORIENT: IMAGINING THE EAST FROM THE COLONIAL ERA THROUGH THE 20TH CENTURY covers the American fascination with the Far East, exploring why the Orient and its image held quite a different meaning for Americans than Europeans.
The British packed their bags and left in 1947, but vestiges from the colonial era continue to linger on in Pakistan, The Scotsman reports.
Jews have lived in small-town New England since the colonial era, but during the last hundred years they have been especially active contributors to the region's cultural life.

Full browser ?