colloquialism

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colloquialism

Vox populi A term of ordinary everyday speech, conversational. See Medical slang.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Generally, colloquial speech tends to reduce a speech pattern to its most convenient form, stopping just short of the point where intelligibility will be compromised.
"Colloquial speech is a daily development," he added, mentioning how "sweet" was now being used by children, including his son, instead of "cool".
In this short poem, the rhythms of colloquial speech are deftly deployed against full rhymes and half-rhymes ("bar/beer, hours/bars") giving the poem the punch of a holiday postcard.
The girls are expected to walk gracefully, dance Mozart's minuet from Don Giovanni, and avoid colloquial speech. When she says "The whiter you are, the higher you get to rise in it ...
While this will surely appeal to a small subset of readers, the lengthy dance descriptions, slight plot, and colloquial speech will deter many.
While contraction or the reduction of unstressed syllables is characteristic of all colloquial speech, according to Fought, it is particularly extreme in Mountain Southern (i.e., "th[ei]nt" for "there ain't"), and, according to Kokeritz, even the polite speech of early modern English.
Users of colloquial speech have kidnapped "awesome," and even "tragic" seems insufficient to adequately express what so many of us feel.
The strategy to combat this problem is to teach students about the differences between colloquial speech and standard English, Story says.
These are followed by a "Translation Guide" with possible translations of the source texts given in the activities, including notes defending the choices made by the translator: "Additional Passages for Grammar Practice," presenting twelve short paragraphs in Italian that highlight grammar features to keep in mind when translating to English, the target language, e.g., the use of various verb tenses, colloquial speech, reported speech; a glossary of the main terms used in discussing translation and analyzing the source texts, including a list of nine translation strategies as defined by J.
Modern English resulted from written text shaped by five factors: (a) brevity induced from accounting/administrative format; (b) aural/oral-based text, written to be heard and seen, that produced conversational style; (c) persistence of indigenous subject-verb-object syntax found in the earliest English documents; (d) a growing Renaissance book market of literate middle-class readers responding to speech-based prose; and (e) English scriptural renditions of the late Renaissance that associated colloquial speech with Protestantism.
colloquial speech), tried both to instruct and to entertain its largely uneducated, boisterous spectators, and developed a style of acting that now would seem excessively histrionic but which Brooks Atkinson of the New York Times praised for a passionate intensity that made uptown actors seem anemic.
There are no pages, or even paragraphs, from Saroyan's work, though time and again the book calls for them and even whets your appetite: "[Saroyan] had an ear for the rhythm, sonority, and sensuality of colloquial speech. He had an eye for the precisely right detail that revealed an emotion, a desire, an anxiety.