parapsychology

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parapsychology

 [par″ah-si-kol´ŏ-je]
the branch of psychology dealing with psychic effects and experiences that appear to fall outside the scope of physical law, e.g., telepathy and clairvoyance.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

par·a·psy·chol·o·gy

(par'ă-sī-kol'ŏ-jē),
The study of extrasensory perception, such as thought transference (telepathy) and clairvoyance.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

parapsychology

(păr′ə-sī-kŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the evidence for psychological phenomena, such as telepathy, clairvoyance, and psychokinesis, that are inexplicable by science.

par′a·psy′cho·log′i·cal (-sī′kə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
par′a·psy·chol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

parapsychology

A field that attempts to apply scientific methods to studying “paranormal” phenomena which are unexplained by natural laws and principles of the physical universe (e.g., clairvoyance, precognition, telekinesis, telepathy).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

par·a·psy·chol·o·gy

(par'ă-sī-kol'ŏ-jē)
The study of extrasensory perception, such as thought transference (telepathy) and clairvoyance.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

parapsychology

The attempted study, by scientific methods, of a range of real or imagined phenomena not explicable by science. The subjects of parapsychology include EXTRASENSORY PERCEPTION, telepathy, clairvoyance, spoon-bending and the movement of objects without physical force (telekinesis). The history of science has been a long and painful struggle to escape from the realms of magical thinking and superstition and many scientists are concerned at the possible dangers of conferring a kind of respectability and plausibility on matters which they consider to be without scientific basis.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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