collective unconscious

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unconscious

 [un-kon´shus]
1. insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
2. the part of the mind that is not readily accessible to conscious awareness by ordinary means but whose existence may be manifested in symptom formation, in dreams, or under the influence of drugs; it is one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.
collective unconscious in jungian psychology, the portion of the unconscious that is theoretically common to mankind.

col·lec·tive un·con·scious

in jungian psychology, the combined memory potentials inherited from a person's phylogenetic past, the deeper layer of the unconscious, wherein reside archetypes. See: archetype (2).
See also: personal unconscious.

collective unconscious

n.
In Jungian psychology, a part of the unconscious mind, shared by a society, a people, or all humankind, that is the product of ancestral experience.

collective unconscious

Psychiatry
A concept posited by Carl Gustav Jung regarding an inborn, symbol-rich psychological foundation common to humanity, which differs slightly according to the culture; he postulated that the collective unconsciousness reflected a group mindset, which would allow for telepathy.

col·lec·tive un·con·scious

(kŏ-lek'tiv ŭn-kon'shŭs)
psychology The combined engrams or memory potentials inherited from a person's phylogenetic past in C.G. Jung's theory.

collective unconscious

An entity, deemed to be a kind of storehouse of ancestral memory, proposed by the Swiss psychiatrist and philosopher Karl Gustav Jung (1875–1961) to explain similarities in symbolism among disparate peoples.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jung entered very murky waters indeed when he suggested that the collective unconsciousness of differing races and nations varied as to contents.
The 'automatic writing' which follows achieves a feat rare in cinema: the cinematic text is avowed as a collective phenomenon, as well as a tissue of contradictions--in other words, the result of a collective unconsciousness, comprised of imaginative projections and phantasmatic apparitions.
Key elements of Jungian theory focus on the ego, personal unconsciousness, collective unconsciousness and archetypes.
The Devil, a Biography throws considerable light onto a still active - and potentially lethal - area of our collective unconsciousness, which surfaces across a whole range of subjects - from how we think of mass murderers to superstitious objections to the apparently satanic nature of some advertising logos.
Many are unable to form a significant self because they are unable or unwilling to come to satisfactory terms with the threatening of "shadow" aspects of the collective unconsciousness.
In this theoretical paper we employ the usage of the psychological theory of the collective unconsciousness to understand the educational phenomena of: the existence and persistence of Independent Black Institutions (IBIs) (1) for over a period of 10,000 years.
With this in mind, we will first give a parsimonious sketch and overview of the major IBIs from ancient Africa to today, second provide the reader with just enough information to obtain a general concept of traditional and topical African educational programs and spaces to buttress the overall focus and trajectory of our work, third outline the theory of the collective unconsciousness, fourth, frame the history, development, and existence of IBIs in the theory of the collective unconsciousness, and last, conclude with a discussion of how our work might challenge previous literature and theories concerning the development of IBIs, Black student achievement, and how "educational spaces are organized to accentuate and cordon off a particular race."
If Oshii's film is hard to get your head around, it's nothing compared to experimentalist director Alain Guiraudie's wilfully baffling collective unconsciousness coming of age thriller.