food irradiation

(redirected from Cold pasteurization)
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The use of low levels—e.g., < 1 mrad—of ionizing radiation to retard spoilage, so named as it has the same effect as pasteurisation—i.e., it improves shelf life and inactivates bacteria that cause food spoilage

food irradiation

The preservation of foods with ionizing radiation. Radiation extends the shelf life of foods by decreasing the number of germs and insects present in them. The process is expensive and has met with considerable resistance from consumers.
See also: irradiation

food irradiation

Deliberate exposure of food to strong ionizing radiation, such as gamma rays, to kill bacteria and insect pests and delay natural changes. Irradiation does not eliminate bacterial poisons (toxins) already formed or kill viruses, but irradiation of food tightly sealed in a suitable container, such as a polythene bag, will kill contained bacteria and further contamination does not occur. Food irradiation by gamma rays does not induce radioactivity; the effects are chemical only and may include changes in flavour and some loss of vitamins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results showed that pasteurization by electromagnetic waves had reduced count of aerobic mesophilic bacteria in egg yolk liquid at least 0.30 to 0.46 logarithmic cycles instantly after cold pasteurization in compare with control samples.
The FDA requires that nuked foods be marked with a stylized flower called a "radura" and a statement such as "treated with radiation." After strenuous lobbying by industry, the FDA consented to reduce the size of the label, and the National Food Processors Association is now trying to replace the word radiation ("Few consumers express willingness to purchase foods with such a label statement") with "cold pasteurization."
So, stay posted as cold pasteurization makes its big play this autumn.
Consumers' comments suggest that distrust will be sharply increased if those who would call the process "cold pasteurization" win the day.
It found people shudder at the thought of "irradiation," yet prefer terminology like "cold pasteurization" or "electronic pasteurization."
Applied to certain foods, the process, called cold pasteurization, avoids changes in color, flavor, texture, and nutrients that might occur with thermal pasteurization.
However, a lack of fundamental knowledge about the biophysical processes occurring within the food itself during the treatment and the mechanisms of microbial inactivation have restricted industrial development to a partial cold pasteurization preservation process.
In fact, irradiation has been dubbed 'cold pasteurization' by some.
Irradiation is called a cold pasteurization process, and the food, in most cases, is exposed for only parts of a second without raising the temperature more than one-and-a-half degrees.
In the future, companies will be able to seek approval to use words such as 'cold pasteurization' instead of irradiation, the FDA said.
Serious investigations regarding utilization of ionizing radiation for cold pasteurization were initiated in the early 1950s.
And irradiation--or "cold pasteurization," as it is often referred to--can eliminate or greatly reduce dangerous pathogens on foods, while causing no material change to the food's taste or nutritional content.