neologism

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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
DEREVERED deprogrammed from some cult, a coined word.
DEROTAVATORED a coined word describing the state of a farmer who has had his rotary cultivator (rotavator) stolen or repossessed.
DESUFFUSED a coined word describing the effect seen when a video played in reverse shows a liquid, color or light leaving a medium in which it had previously spread or suffused.
DETERRETED with the metal ring (terret) removed, from a collar, strap, etc., no longer terreted, a coined word. (Palindromicon)
In addition, most of the chatters and conversations contained new coined words, acronyms or mobile languages.
There were lots of new terms and coined words emerged from playing online games such as "GG' (good game), catastrophic, feeder, eliminate, invulnerable, continent, countermeasures, devour and many more.
As a conclusion, although MMORPGs have the tendency to promote mobile languages and other coined words, it is undeniable that MMORPGs facilitated in language development, especially in the aspect of vocabulary learning.
the one in the weekly Globus (36) where the author quoted some of the newly coined words and evaluated them.
Kryzan-Stanojevic (2001) to some extent also covers the problem of the attitudes to newly coined words discussing the strategies that have to be used if we want the speech community to accept the proposed neologisms.
(G) Seeing the newly coined words from the contest I would suggest that we--who are participating in this forum--also suggest new Croatian words."
OED items are labeled *, Webster's Third are labeled +, Webster's Biographical are labeled #, Random House are labeled @, and coined words are labeled -.
Readers of Word Ways have tried to find a 15-letter word which has 5 of one letter, 4 of a second letter, 3 of a third letter, 2 of a fourth letter and I of a fifth letter, in Geometrical Words: Part 1 (Word Ways August 1997), I wrote 'The dictionary-sanctioned word which makes a triangle with the letter ratio 5:4:3:2:1 remains as elusive as ever, the only representatives are cleverly coined words such as Sir Jeremy Morse's 'linenlessnesses'.