cohort

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cohort

 [ko´hort]
in research and statistics, a group of individuals who share a characteristic at some specific time and who are then followed forward in time, with data being collected at one or more suitable intervals. The most common use of the term is to describe a birth cohort, in which all the group members are born in a specified time period, but other common characteristics could define the cohort, such as marriage date, exposure to an infectious agent, or date of diagnosis or of treatment for a disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt),
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epidemiologic cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cohort

EBM
A subgroup of a population with a common feature, usually age (e.g., all persons in the UK born in 1964 form a birth cohort).

Social medicine
A group of persons born at about the same time who share common historical or cultural experiences.

Trials
A group of persons or animals of the same species with a common characteristic, set of characteristics, or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cohort

Clinical trials A group of persons with a common characteristic, set of characteristics or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study. See Birth cohort, Cluster, Inception cohort.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epide miological cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cohort

A group of persons all born on the same day. Cohort studies are valuable in medical and epidemiological research.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cohort

a group of organisms in a population all of which are the same age.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
Designated group followed or traced over a period.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
With these additions, the trial now includes 20 expansion cohorts and four exploratory cohorts and aims to enroll up to 1,732 patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors such as renal cell carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma, among others.
Social Security benefits at age 65--determined by an individual's highest annual earnings over a 35-year period--are higher for women in the boomer cohort. For example, average Social Security wealth (SSW), the present discounted value of lifetime benefits, for women in the boomer cohort is about $145,000, 26 percent greater than the average value for the early cohort.
Although the authors recognize that some districts may lack the current infrastructure to support such approaches, the purpose of this article is to present district cohort training approaches that can enhance the leadership capacity of pre-K-12 school counselors and school counseling supervisors in urban, rural, and suburban settings.
With use of the World War II cohort as the reference group for comparison, the odds ratio for arthritis in Gen Xers was 3.2; for younger baby boomers, it was 2.14; for older baby boomers, it was 1.48.
Burge identifies the traits of cohort 1 as core identity formation, developing peer relationships as well as student and college validation.
PROGESTERONE COHORT: 262 of 398 had live births 65.8% PLACEBO COHORT: 271 of 428 had live births 63.3% BY DEEPAK CHITNIS
The first interesting finding was that the chance of surviving from birth to 93 years was 28% higher in the 1915 cohort than in the 1905 cohort and the chance of reaching 95 years was 32% higher in the 1915 cohort.
(2) Furthermore, for all cohorts, the average quality of each published paper and page is about three times better for graduates of the top programs compared to the non-top programs.
To construct the prediction of the aggregate LFP rate for 2008-12, we assign, for cohorts born after 1991, the average cohort effect of the last 20 cohorts.
OBJECTIVES: Our goal was to create a comprehensive overview of European birth cohorts with environmental exposure data.