Cohen


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Co·hen

(kō′ən), Stanley Born 1922.
American biochemist. He shared a 1986 Nobel Prize for the discovery of the epidermal growth factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Batalla's "The Gospel According to Leonard Cohen," presented by UCLA Live, brings together singers Jackson Browne, Michael McDonald, Howard Tate, Dave Alvin and Julie Christensen in the service of such enduring songs as "Bird on the Wire," "Sisters of Mercy" and "Joan of Arc.
All together, Eulau and Cohen have leased 60,000 s/f in the building where retail asking rents run from $85 to $100 per square foot and office rents run from $40 to $50 per square foot.
Despite women's progress, the industry still is considered to be "more of a man's world than a woman's world," Cohen said, adding that the APIW is among the creators of the "old girls network.
The stark Jew's harp that is his "break" simply adds a raw poignancy to a question that is as simple and basic as Cohen himself is becoming as he matures in grace to be a wizened sage for our time.
In one indelible Interlude, Cohen and Sillen grant protracted screen time to a buzz-cut urchin determinedly giving the camera the finger.
Cohen also had to pay the 10% penalty tax for an early withdrawal from an IRA.
Cohen skillfully and convincingly compares the British and German cases, and the specific brands of veterans' politics that emerged in each state.
For Cohen and Jinks, working with talented people on small, adventurous projects has been a career hallmark from the very beginning.
Cohen strings his guests along much further than The Daily Show usually does, and he has managed to arrange interviews with an impressive list of public figures, including former Attorney General Ed Meese (who performs a rap), former National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft (who says we'd never nuke Canada because "we don't want what they have"), former CIA Director James Woolsey (who tries to clear up Ali G's confusion between John F.
Lizabeth Cohen, a history professor at Harvard, proudly opens A Consumers, Republic with an adorable photograph of herself and her younger sister as little girls in the yard of a New Jersey ranch house in 1956, and follows that with a short autobiographical account of her greatest-generation parents' steady movement up the New York suburban ladder after the war.
Johannessen owns a small organic farm just outside the city of Eugene, "where he plants for food, fun, and scientific interest," says Cohen.
Craig Cohen makes the statement casually, almost as if unaware of the startling and controversial implications of his words.