cohabit

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cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
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As such, cohabitation conveys the idea, expressed in the French literature, of forcing two ideological incompatible individuals to live together (Skach, 2007: 102).
Cohabitation has been particularly discussed in the field of recent comparative politics, mainly in the two representative research lines stressing "the demerits" or "the perils of cohabitation" (Elgie, 2011: 12) and its "merits".
The empirical findings and evidences analyzed by some of the most important authors of the theme of semi-presidentialism and, subsumed, of cohabitation and intraexecutive conflict, as G.
The opposite predictions made about the level of educational homogamy in cohabitation relative to marriage apparently stem from the different assumptions about the meaning and role of cohabitation in the two approaches.
Canada offers an excellent opportunity to test these theories, as cohabitation has reached very different levels of institutionalization across different regions.
First, we suggest that higher levels of institutionalization and acceptance of cohabitation in Quebec should be reflected in smaller differences between married and unmarried couples with respect to assortative mating patterns.
cohabitations lasting two years or longer would be prevented from
cohabitations analogous to marriage adhere to the same duties and
Thus, the justifications that courts use in awarding alimony should be an important factor in determining the legal effect of cohabitation on alimony.
Although cohabitation has traditionally been an uncommon phenomenon in the fabric of American life, the frequency and acceptance of cohabitation have risen dramatically since 1970.
The choice between marriage and cohabitation is based on the evaluation of union types.
The same also applies to cohabitation and marriage, gender cannot distinguish cohabiting and married people; in spite of this, the intentions to marry or cohabite could be different according to gender.