cognitive impairment


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cognitive impairment

The loss of intellectual function, i.e., of thinking effectively. It may occur briefly after drug overdose or alcohol use, during sepsis, or after severe head injury. Permanent cognitive impairment may occur in older adults. Approximately half of the population over 85 show permanently impaired thinking when tested with standard assessment tools.
See also: impairment
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
During that time, 532 people developed mild cognitive impairment.
PCMHI providers are uniquely positioned to assist primary care providers in evaluating and managing patients with cognitive impairment. The present study examines the effects of a brief marketing effort by PCMHI staff on the frequency of referral for cognitive screening in primary care.
Because it was not a randomised, controlled trial, the study cannot prove a cause and effect relationship between lung disease and dementia or mild cognitive impairment.
Among the 1840 participants, there were 1713 normal participants and 127 cognitive impairment participants in 2009.
"Cognitive screening was conducted more frequently in older, employed, or white patients, while the presence of cognitive impairment was documented more often in black, nonworking, and those on Medicare or Medicaid," Dr.
Uncovering the Pathophysiology of Cognitive Impairment in PD Using rs-fMRI
This study finds the correlation of various physiological factors among elderly people with cognitive impairment.
Cognitive impairment is commonly referred to as a reduction in global cognition that is new and affects at least 2 areas of cognitive function that can be measured using a standard cognitive function test (e.g., Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) or the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA)) [23, 24].
The new data suggest NSI-189's potential applicability to protect the brain against permanent cognitive impairment in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Among patients with mild cognitive impairment, those with extrapyramidal signs were about six times more likely to develop non-Alzheimer's forms of dementia than those without baseline extrapyramidal signs, according to a prospective multicenter analysis.
Cognitive impairment can be defined as problems in memory, language, thinking, or judgment.

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