cognate

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cognate

describes two biomolecules that normally interact such as an enzyme and its normal substrate or a receptor and its normal ligand.

cognate cooperation
cooperation between T and B lymphocytes when both recognize epitopes on the same antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following is the list of such terms in Brahui that have cognates in Peninsular Dravidian, which also does not distinguish between reflexes of *k and *q.
One word of caution: "false" cognates do exist that could cause problems in the classroom.
tiine) compares Fi tiine and its Finnic cognates (Kar tiineh, Veps tineh, Est tiine < PFi *tineh) to MariE, MariW tuz 'pregnant (of animals)'.
To the oldest layer of inherited stems belong stems that have cognates in one or several Samoyed languages: Nenets (Tundra or Forest Nenets), Enets, Nganasan, Selkup, or already vanished Kamass and Mator and which are not loans from Indo-European.
The cognates are indicated in every reading, but it would be advantageous to ask learners to identify them to practice cognate recognition.
However, in this particular case, whether Nhanda words with cognates in other Australian languages are the result of direct inheritance or the result of borrowing is irrelevant.
Fi ammottaa gape open has cognates in southern Finnic: Est ammutama 'gape open; open one's mouth wide'and Liv amtlo'yawn'.
Resources on cognates between English and other languages are also available.
Cognates are words that have a similar meaning and form across languages, often descending from the same ancient language; for example, "cold" is a cognate of the German word "kalt" since they both descended from Middle English.
Nonetheless, cognates from other Aramaic languages, Arabic, Ethiopic.
Ross was able to deduce this because of the words "pensive" and "agitated," which have cognates in French.
Research into English-language materials is, however, not exhaustive: a greater consideration of the medieval evidence might further illuminate the semantic range of OS blao, ON blar (ME bla, blamon), and their cognates, for instance.