coercion

(redirected from Coersion)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future, or the use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric—e.g., child psychiatry—or treatment of substance abuse

coercion

Public safety Threat of kidnapping, extortion, force or violence to be performed immediately or in the future or use of parental, custodial, or official authority over a child < age 15; the use of some form of force to compel a person into therapy, most commonly psychiatric–eg, child psychiatry, or treatment of substance abuse
References in periodicals archive ?
Threats of abandonment based on a patient's choice are another example of coersion and control.
Manente: its cruelty and "monstrosity," traits that, I will argue, provide insight into the social structures of the mid-sixteenth century, particularly those that rely upon coersion and force.
Now, however, there is no such remainder: "[S]ociety," writes Mill, "has now fairly got the better of individuality; and the danger which threatens human nature is not the excess, but the deficiency, of personal impulses and preferences." (40) "In our times," Mill continues, "every one lives as under the eye of a hostile and dreaded censorship." (41) Discipline through surveillance, and coersion through standardization has become commonplace.
But it is unlikely to work without coersion; something that the constituency parties, which select candidates, will find difficult to accept.
See also McCartney, supra note 14, at 609-10 and accompanying text (reducing the topic of informed consent into five general components: (1) medical competency, (2) disclosure of information, (3) understanding, (4) freedom from coersion in making the decision, and (5) acceptance or rejection of the proposed medical treatment).
Furthermore, she states that the contraction between liberty and coersion that this tension illustrates is at the heart of the Revolution, with coersion eventually gaining the upper hand through the Jacobins.