coelacanth

(redirected from Coelacanths)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Coelacanthclick for a larger image
Fig. 111 Coelacanth . Latimeria chalumnae. Length: 1.5m.

coelacanth

a primitive bony fish with lobed fins (as distinct from ray fins). Almost all its relatives were freshwater fossil forms dating from the DEVONIAN PERIOD. Latimeria is a living marine form found round the Comoro Islands off Southeast Africa and collected for the first time in 1938. It is remarkable in that it has remained almost unchanged from its ancestors in the lower CARBONIFEROUS PERIOD, that existed more than 300 million years ago.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, according to information reprinted from materials provided by University of the Witwatersrand, various specimens of Africa's earliest coelacanth (Serenichthys kowiensis) have been found in a 360 million year-old fossil estuary near Grahamstown, in South Africa's Eastern Cape by palaeontologist Dr Robert Gess and described by him in collaboration with Professor Michael Coates of the University of Chicago.
A three-dimensional reconstruction of the basal sarcopterygian coelacanth Aqp4 channel, based upon the structure mask of the crystallographically resolved human AQP4 ortholog (Protein Data Bank 3GD8), shows that this arrangement is evolutionarily conserved (Fig.
An international team of researchers join forces to decode the genome of the once-thought-to-be-extinct African coelacanth
The African coelacanth has effectively been frozen in time since before dinosaurs evolved.
Evidence of the coelacanth disappeared from the fossil record during the last great extinction when more than 50 percent of the world's animal species, including the dinosaurs, were wiped out.
These include pycnodontiform fish like Turbomesodon, the coelacanth "Holophagus" (one of the largest), Lepidotes, and several amiiform species (Vidalamia, Caturus and Amiopsis) (Poyato-Ariza and Wenz, 2004).
Many enthusiasts, motivated by studies of paranormal phenomena, the discovery of large animals unknown to science in times when it was thought all major vertebrates were discovered, such as the okapi (Okapia johnstoni), or discovery of species belonging to groups long thought extinct such as coelacanths (Latimeria spp.), are interested in finding new examples of that sort (Heuvelmans, 1955).
''Since 2005, we have heard of about 36 cases where coelacanths have been caught in Tanzania,'' Jiddawi said.
If the reader will pardon my indulgence, most biologists thought that coelacanths had been extinct for 70 million years until 1938 when fishermen of South Africa were found to have been regularly catching and eating them.
It is hard to imagine parents of the future paying genetic engineers to provide them with coelacanths for children.
Apparently, the coelocanths, unaware of their evolutionary duty, had been making nothing but more baby coelacanths all this time.