cochineal

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Related to Cochineal extract: Natural Red 4

coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl'), [C.I. 75470]
The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain. See: carmine.
Synonym(s): coccinella, coccus (2)
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]

cochineal

/coch·i·neal/ (koch´ĭ-nēl) dried female insects of Coccus cacti, enclosing young larvae; used as a coloring agent for pharmaceuticals and as a biological stain.

cochineal

[koch′inēl′]
Etymology: L, coccineus, bright red
a red dye prepared from the dried female insects of the species Coccus cacti containing young larvae. During the preparation of the dye the larvae are extracted with an aqueous solution of alum. The resulting dye has been used in coloring medicines.

coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl)
[CI 75470] The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain.
See: carmine
Synonym(s): coccus (2) .
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]
References in periodicals archive ?
Dactylopius coccus, is commonly sun-dried, crushed and dipped in an alcohol solution to create carminic acid--the pigment which eventually becomes the colorant carmine or cochineal extract for use in food and beverages.
7) It was a 2001 petition submitted by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) over undeclared allergens in foods (28) that in 2011 resulted in the new requirement that cochineal extract be declared on labels rather than included under vague labeling such as "color added" or "artificial color.
While eating cochineal extract poses no risk to healthy consumers, the term "insect" does not exactly sound appetizing on a label.
According to the FDA, cochineal extract and carmine, the lake form of the additive, have been used since the late 1800s in such foods as pork sausages, ice cream, strawberry-flavored milk, imitation crab and lobster, maraschino cherries, Port wine cheeses, lumpfish eggs and colored spirits like Campari[R].
FDA may require clearer labeling of food additives: Food & Drug Administration is now in the process of considering a proposal to require color additives like the cochineal extract to be disclosed on the labels of all foods that use them.
Cochineal extract and carmine products arc very versatile natural red colors and can yield orange to red to purple shades across the pH range of most food products (2.