coccyx

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coccyx

 [kok´siks]
the small bone caudad to the sacrum in humans, formed by the union of four (sometimes five or three) rudimentary vertebrae, and forming the caudal end of the vertebral column.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

coc·cyx

, gen.

coc·cy·gis

, pl.

coc·cy·ges

(kok'siks, -si-jis, -si-jēs), [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations kok'iks and kos'iks.
The small bone at the end of the vertebral column in humans, formed by the fusion of four rudimentary vertebrae; it articulates above with the sacrum.
[G. kokkyx, a cuckoo, the coccyx]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coccyx

(kŏk′sĭks)
n. pl. coccyges (kŏk-sī′jēz, kŏk′sĭ-jēz′)
A small triangular bone at the base of the spinal column in humans and other apes, consisting of several fused rudimentary vertebrae. Also called tailbone.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

coc·cyx

, pl. coccyges (kok'siks, -si-jēz) [TA]
The small bone at the end of the vertebral column in humans, formed by the fusion of four rudimentary vertebrae; it articulates above with the sacrum.
[G. kokkyx, a cuckoo, the coccyx]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

coccyx

The rudimentary tail bone, consisting of four small vertebrae fused together and joined to the curved SACRUM. From the resemblance of the bone to a cuckoo's beak.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

coccyx

the fusion of the posterior vertebrae to form a single unit, the coccyx. In humans three to five vertebrae are involved and these form the remnant of a tail.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Coccyx

The last bone of the spinal column, consisting of three to five fused vertebrae that connect with the sacrum, a part of the pelvis.
Mentioned in: Coccyx Injuries
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus this study was conducted and we found promising results wherein 61% of the adult pelvises observed by us showed the presence of intervertebral discs between sacral vertebrae and coccygeal vertebrae. We assume that this variation may be due to the late fusion or incomplete fusion pattern of sacral and coccygeal vertebrae which may cause mobility of sacrum and coccyx leading to instability of the pelvic girdle.
We also found the presence of discs between coccygeal vertebrae in 15% of male pelvises.
The fusion process of sacral and coccygeal vertebrae is said to be partially dependent on human upright posture and locomotion.