coca

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co·ca

(kō'kă),
The dried leaves of Erythroxylon coca, yielding not less than 0.5% of ether-soluble alkaloids; the source of cocaine and several other alkaloids.
[S. Am.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

co·ca

(kō'kă)
The dried leaves of Erythroxylon coca, yielding not less than 0.5% of ether-soluble alkaloids; source of cocaine and several other alkaloids.
[S. Am.]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
legalize small-scale cultivation of coca leaf for personal use as a traditional remedy, though objecting countries, including the U.S.
The order also defines coca leaf "as regional biological, cultural, and historical patrimony, and a botanical resource integrated with the culture and cosmovision of the Andean world and the customs and traditions of medicinal culture."
The 2011-2015 Strategy to Combat Drug Trafficking and Reduction of Excess Cultivation of Coca Leaf proposes stabilizing coca production at 12,000 ha in the Yungas region, 7,000 ha in the Chapare region, and 1,000 ha in La Paz' Caranavi region, which exceeds the EU estimate of 14,705 ha needed for traditional coca consumption.
Martinez said that those "who produce coca leaf are not drug traffickers nor terrorists and coca leaf is not cocaine."
Bolivia has declared its intention to reduce net coca cultivation to 20,000 ha by 2015, as published in the 2011-2015 Strategy to Combat Drug Trafficking and Reduction of Excess Cultivation of Coca Leaf.
Bolivia's efforts to amend the United Nations' 1961 Single Convention on Narcotics Drugs with the aim of removing references to traditional uses for coca leaf including coca leaf chewing were unsuccessful, and the country has since presented a denunciation to the United Nations that makes its withdrawal effective January 1, 2012.
The USG estimates for coca leaf, cocaine, marijuana, opium, and heroin production are potential estimates; that is, it is assumed that all of the coca, marijuana, and poppy grown is harvested and processed into illicit drugs.
For the near-term, drug traffickers will continue to exploit opportunities to process abundant coca leaf into cocaine, suborn more Bolivian institutions and increase their influence in Bolivian communities.
The study was supposed to have been launched in 2004 with results ready in 2005, but was delayed for many reasons, including attempts by the GOB to expand the terms of reference to include potential commercialization of coca leaf. In September 2010, the GOB passed legislation intended to enhance regulation over coca leaf sales by restricting the amount of coca leaf that can be sold to five pounds per coca grower per month.
Bolivia produces coca leaf for traditional purposes, such as chewing, making tea and religious rites, but this coca leaf is also diverted to cocaine production.
Eighty per cent of the coca has been grown in the same area for the past 10 years, while crops produce 33% more coca leaf - the main cocaine ingredient - than they did in 2012.