cobra

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cobra

 [ko´brah]
any of numerous extremely poisonous elapid snakes commonly found in Africa, Asia, and India. They are capable of expanding the neck region to form a hood, and have two comparatively short, erect, deep grooved fangs. A serum obtained from animals inoculated with cobra venom is used in counteracting the effects of the venom. Species include the Asian cobra and king cobra of Asia and the Egyptian cobra found throughout Africa and the Arabian peninsula. See also snakebite.

co·bra

(kō'bră),
Snakes generally of the highly venomous snake genus, Naja (family Elapidae); six species are recognized, all African except for the Asiatic cobra; typical behavior includes spreading of the neck (hood), rearing one third of the body off the ground, and, in some species, the spitting of venom, which is primarily neurotoxic. There are also cobras that belong to the genera Pseudohaje, Hemachatus, and Ophiophagus.
[Port. snake, from L. coluber, snake]

cobra

/co·bra/ (ko´brah) any of several extremely poisonous elapid snakes commonly found in Africa, Asia, and India, which are capable of expanding the neck region to form a hood and have two comparatively short, erect, deep grooved fangs. Most inject venom by biting but some species, spitting c's, can eject a fine spray of venom several meters and cause severe eye irritation or blindness.

cobra

(kō′brə)
n.
Any of various venomous elapid snakes, especially of the genus Naja, that are native to Asia and Africa and are capable of expanding the skin of the neck to form a flattened hood.

cobra

[kō′brä]
any of numerous extremely poisonous elapid snakes commonly found in Africa, Asia, and India. They are capable of expanding the neck region to form a hood and have two comparatively short, erect, deep grooved fangs. A serum obtained from animals inoculated with cobra venom is used in counteracting the effects of the venom. Species include the Asian cobra and king cobra of Asia and the Egyptian cobra found throughout Africa and the Arabian peninsula. See also snakebite.

COBRA

[kō′brə]
Cardiology COmparison of Balloon vs. Rotational Angioplasty. A clinical trial comparing 2 methods of managing complex coronary lesions
Conclusion Both are effective with few complications
Managed care Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985. A federal act which requires employers to offer employee health coverage under the employer's group health plan for a period of time after a spouse’s death, job loss, work hour reduction, or divorce, allowing them to purchase continuation of health care coverage under the group’s medical plan Managed Care Contracting Handbook, McGraw-Hill, 1996

COBRA

(kō'bră)

COBRA,

COBRA

(kō'bră)
Acronym for U.S. federal Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, which allowed fired workers to continue with group health insurance coverage for a period.

cobra

a venomous snake of the family Elapidae. Called also Naja spp.

cobra venom
a component, cobra venom factor, causes depletion of complement and is used experimentally to reproduce genetic complement deficiencies. Pharmaceutical preparations have been used intralesionally in acral lick dermatitis to cause a local hypalgesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The name cobra references several species of snakes, most of which are in the venomous snake family Elapidae," Sara Viernum, a herpetologist, told (https://www.
The way a snake moves, through sleek body curves, light shining off its scales, is one of the most impressive sights nature has to offer," says cobra expert Wolfgang Wuster at the University of Wales, who collaborated with Slowinski in naming the new cobra.
One night in rural Myanmar, Slowinski came upon a spitting cobra lying on a road.
The 10 most lethal snakes in the world belong to the elapids--often called the cobra family.
With this double-barreled sense of smell, a cobra can easily pursue the trail of a rat, for example.
In a flash the cobra lunges, sinking its fangs into the prey and quickly releasing it.
Price, today announced that Superformance has filed counterclaims against Caroll Shelby requesting a court order that Shelby does not own any valid trademark rights which would permit him to prevent the manufacture of replicas of the original Cobra.
These counterclaims are in response to a lawsuit filed in Boston by Shelby and his associated companies alleging trademark infringement, dilution and unfair competition relating to Superformance's manufacture and sale of replicas of Cobra cars.
The original Shelby Cobra was manufactured from just 1962 to 1967.
The counterclaims and defenses filed by Superformance state that Shelby and Ford have long since abandoned any rights in the Cobra name, the shape of the Cobra automobile, or the designations associated with the Cobra models because of their failure to prevent the widespread use of those names and shapes by replica manufacturers.
Superformance manufactures a range of component vehicles, including replicas of the 1960s Cobra sports car in South Africa and exports them to North America, Europe and Australia.